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Transcriptors Skeleton Reviews

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Transcriptors Skeleton

Transcriptors Skeleton

9/10 by slshearer

I purchased my Skeleton in 1974, as the owner of this Turntable I would recommend the ownership of this piece of Vinyl history!
Anyone who has a love of simplicity of mechanical engineering and understands the challenges of manufacturing this type of design will definitely appreciate owning this Turntable. When one realizes that this Transcriptor set a new standard that has been copied by highly rated Oracle, Mitchell and other high-quality manufacturers since the Skeleton was introduced.

It has been super reliable, and I found with a little investigation and testing by trial the common issues with the design can be resolved, The tonearm is subject to sonic feedback with the SME arm I installed,
Special note to make sure the audio RCA cables from the tonearm are not being pinched through the outside of the rear glass panel against the glass base. After extensive checking to solve this I found another cause of distorted playback was caused by the 3 lower support feet, I installed 3 low profile isolation pads improved the sound reproduction immensely,
The top glass needs to have the 4 felt pads replaced so they support the glass from resonating on the 4 vertical support posts. Also, a piece of felt should be installed to prevent the hinge arm support from vibrating against the glass top.


The original design of the unique massive platter and the chrome support Pads will keep your records spotless & static-free from dirt and dust with the regular use of a dishwasher pad & a static gun. Platter Speed accuracy is impressive I believe this is due to the high torques motor and the weight of the platter, even after all these years it still accurately tracks any record with no pitch control, a credit to the design of the high torque motor used in the original design, in event the motor died there are several newer designs which could be easily installed. Replace the belt every couple of years and keep clean with a quality glass cleaner.
Overall, I would recommend anyone who has a love of engineering as this design definitely set a new standard that has been copied by highly rated Oracle, Mitchell and other high-quality manufacturers since the Skeleton was introduced.

Replace the belt every couple of years and keep clean with a quality glass cleaner. Definitely, a great piece of history and everyone's favourite to look at ( I guess that's why it's on exhibit to the American Museum of Art! If you are lucky enough to find a well-preserved example and do the mods, I suggest you'll enjoy the beauty and great sound for your hard-earned dollars!

Enjoy and Rock On
Stewart

5/10 by anmpr1

What can one say about something like this? My example was visually stunning, with chromed pods supporting the record. The heavy glass enclosure sparkled. Too bad the motor died after a couple of years, and the company (I think in Ireland) was unavailable to assist. The Vestigial arm had problems (back issues of the Boston Audio Society's newsletter, available on-line, chronicled design errors of this, plus the similar albeit larger Japanese-made Dynavector arm). Therefore, I opted for the Grace G-707. But what's the point of a beautiful turntable without a working motor? I traded it in at a high end shop whose owner placed it in their display window as a curiosity. Still, I think it was one of the first visually stunning turntables, soon followed up by the Ira Gale/Sao Win Gale GT 2101--a really sophisticated item that looked even better than the Transcriptors, in my opinion.


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