deep groove?

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Deck
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deep groove?

Post by Deck » 30 Sep 2004 01:33

:? what exactly is 'deep groove' are the grooves actualy physically deeper than normal? and what are/were the pros and cons?

you see this mentioned a lot in regard to blue note pressings and the like

deck

:?

Highriver
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Post by Highriver » 30 Sep 2004 03:07

I know of a serious Blue Note collector and will submit your question to him.

Stay Tuned.

DCE
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Post by DCE » 30 Sep 2004 06:21

Hello,

The "deep groove" refers to a groove in the label area of the LP pressing on early Blue Notes; not to the information "grooves" being deeper.

See here:

http://ronpenndorf.com/labelography.html

Dan

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Post by Highriver » 30 Sep 2004 23:22

Here is the response I recieved from Allan Songer who is a long time member at the Klipsch Forums

http://www.klipsch.com (great forum BTW )

The term "deep-groove" refers to the type of pressing machine used by MANY record pressing plants from the dawn of the LP era up until the mid-1960's in many cases. The company that pressed ALL Blue Note records from the beginning until the sale to Liberty Records in mid-1966 was "Plastylite" in New Jersey.
Until 1960 ALL Blue Note LPs were "deep-groove," and you can tell by looking at the label--on both sides you will see (AND FEEL) a "deep" groove at the place on the label you find the address (767 Lexington on early LPs, 47 W 63rd on later LPs). Starting with Blue Note 4059 (Undercurrent, Kenny Drew), the use of the "deep groove" pressing machine for Blue Notes was hit and miss. Plastylite bought NEW equipment in mid-1960 and the new machines did NOT put in a deep groove! But they also KEPT the old machine going, so SOME of the Blue Notes after mid-1960 got deep-grooves in either ONE or BOTH sides (4059 for example exists only as a deep-groove one side pressing--there were no second pressings of this VERY RARE title)!

What makes all of this important, of course, is that if you find a pressing of a title previous to 4059 that DOES NOT have deep-grooves on both sides, then you KNOW it's a second pressing! On the other hand, if you find a late title with deep-grooves this would ALSO indicate a second-pressing because almost all FIRST pressings were done on the NEW equipment! But collectors actually LOOK for the deep grooves on later pressings even though it most likely indicates a second pressing--GO FIGURE!

As far as sound quality goes, there is no doubt that the early deep-groove pressings are among the best sounding LPs ever produced. And they stand up to an INCREDIBLE amount of abuse! I have some early Lexington Ave pressings (1542, Sonny Rollins for example) that LOOK beat but play nearly dead-quiet. Many vinyl guys would have passed on this one at ANY price because of the way it looks, but experience has taught me that a VG- visual grade on a deep-groove Blue Note doesn't NECESSARILY mean the record is noisy. Someone like PaulParrot would scoff at this notion I'm sure, but I am speaking from YEARS AND YEARS of experience. I own EVERY BLUE NOTE TITLE pressed from 1955 through 1970 (not all FIRST pressings, but all "original"--about 90% firsts though) and have owned MULTIPLE copies of most over the years (always horse-trading and upgrading, you know) and I know what I'm talking about.

I hope this helps.

Deck
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Post by Deck » 04 Oct 2004 00:33

:) thanks for the info guys.

what was i thinking? deeper grooves doh!

:oops:

deck

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