The contribution of stereo - 1958

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johnnywalker
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The contribution of stereo - 1958

Post by johnnywalker » 09 Jun 2019 01:55

I was just listening to my original copy of "MUSIC FOR BANG, baa-rOOM AND HARP," recorded in 1958, the very early days of stereo. In the notes on the back of the album, written by someone named Bob Bollard, is this:

"The big contribution of stereo is space. It's true that stereo can 'place' different instruments on opposite sides of your living room. But only when each instrument or group is surrounded with its own envelope of space do we get the real, live, round sound. Without the sense of space around and between we just have two monaural recordings playing side by side."

How perceptive! I'm sure we have all heard our share of those "monaural recordings playing side by side," many of them recorded long after 1958.

Roberto C2H3
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Re: The contribution of stereo - 1958

Post by Roberto C2H3 » 09 Jun 2019 02:25

A very nice synthesis indeed 8)

JoeE SP9
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Re: The contribution of stereo - 1958

Post by JoeE SP9 » 11 Jun 2019 01:07

IMO/E most modern pop/rock music recordings are nothing but multi-channel mono. They have no sense of space. Yes, they have great left to right imaging but there is no space. That space is what we now call a soundstage.

Unfortunately, if you want to hear that "space" you are pretty much restricted to Jazz and Classical recordings.

johnnywalker
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Re: The contribution of stereo - 1958

Post by johnnywalker » 12 Jun 2019 12:42

In too many cases, you are correct. Last night I was listening to a record titled "Hi Presents The Greatest Hits From Memphis," a compendium of several early R&R tracks released in 1969. I couldn't help but notice that with some groups, like Bill Black's Combo, there was at least an attempt to present a somewhat correct soundstage, with the individual instruments spread across the room and with some attemp at each one having its own place in the soundscape. There was no sense of space, however, so I suspect it was an artificial attempt by the mixer/engineer to mix the individual instruments in a way that mimicked a band on stage. But other groups, like Willie Mitchell's band, were pure two-track mono.

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Re: The contribution of stereo - 1958

Post by Pikey » 16 Jun 2019 21:42

Isn't 'stereo' derived from the greek for 'solid'? ... that kind of sums up a soundstage for me!

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