Static problems

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rems
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Static problems

Post by rems » 15 Sep 2004 19:37

My turntable plater/discs are building up so much static that the vinyls tend to stick to the plater when I want to take it...

Seems to me that something is wrong!

I always brush my discs with a carbon brush and I'm not shure (at all) what I should do to get rid of that problem. I figure it is no use to say that a considerable amount of dust sticks to the discs and that the static can even be heard in some cases.

The turntable ground is pluged to the amp, but since the amplifier itself does not have a ground connection to the wall, I wounder how it could work. Could it be a good thing to switch the power cord for one with a ground and work with the plug instead of grounging through the amplifier?

Could those anti-static sprays be a temporary solution (although I've heard they can be damagign)?

Thank you!


EDIT : I read a little more and though about grounding my carbon fibre bristles brush by wirering the stainless handle to the ground of an electrical plug.

StephDale
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Post by StephDale » 16 Sep 2004 10:03

Rems,

Okay, let's stick to the basics: Have you got your discs in antistatic sleeves? That'll do a lot to help :wink:

I notice occasional problems with static during periods of hot, dry weather. Yes we do sometimes have that in the UK... :roll:

What's your heating system like? If it's a hot air or air-conditioning system; that will build up a static charge; much like a thunderstorm is generated in nature. :!:

And a solution? Well I use a antistatic 'pistol'. They are available from hi-fi stores, though mine came from a wholesaler of packaging tools and equipment.

It is worth making sure that the tonearm/headshell and platter are both connected to the earth. For example; I get less static stress with my Thorens TD160 S BC V because it's got a metal platter and arm. The worst is the Rega P25 because it's got an acrylic (i.e. static charged) platter. Somewhere in between is the TD160 Super because the arm has a few acrylic parts in it...

The earthing to ground issue might be a bit of a red herring; I have very few static problems earthing to my phono stage (McLaren PPA20) which has a floating ground with no direct connection to earth.

Hope you manage to find a solution and that this helps; static can be a real pain. :twisted:

rems
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Post by rems » 16 Sep 2004 13:01

Okay, let's stick to the basics: Have you got your discs in antistatic sleeves? That'll do a lot to help
Strangely enough, those in an antistatic sleeve are the worse :?: Unless I am quite wrong and that antistatic sleeve are not the plastic lined ones.

Heating of the appartment is achieved by hot water radiators and it does get pretty dry in here (Montréal) during winter. Yet summer is usually very humid (70-80%).

I figure you must be right about floating ground, and the problem might simply be the few discs I played in the last days.
If this is the case, I will mainly need to find a way to remove static from those discs, and this is wy I though of grounding my brush (I read something about a grounded brush here on the forum). It would be easily done and inexpensive.

Thank you for your help, I appreciate.

SteveC
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Post by SteveC » 17 Sep 2004 10:27

Yes, you did miss something -- those are not antistatic sleeves. Try a search for Nagaoka 102 sleeve for an example make.

TRIPOD
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Post by TRIPOD » 21 Sep 2004 04:27

Hi Rems,

The worst things with (or without) heathing for the records are the rugs :evil: !

Depending on how you are dressed (synthetic fibers or else) 8) you are transmitting static electricity discharges from the floor to all the things you are touching you may even sometimes receive shocking experiences :shock: !

First, if you have rugs, get rid of them (Yes, I've done that :P !), rugs and vinyls don't go along very well and rugs aren't good for your health either anyway :cry: ! Second, get a good anti-static gun, use it on your records before playing them and your problem should be history :D !

TRIPOD

Deck
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Post by Deck » 22 Sep 2004 11:02

:? hmmmm.....do those pistols actually work ?

deck

RMA
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Post by RMA » 22 Sep 2004 22:04

Yes, I've used one for about twenty odd years and there's no question about, it they do work. Somewhere along the line the piezo crystal will give up the ghost, but it took about 15 years in my case.

Recommended!

cgb
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Post by cgb » 25 Sep 2004 23:59

Hi,

I think brushing the records also builds up static... I use a Zerostat anti-static pistol quite successfully. If record is charged at end of playing, I shoot it again before putting it back into the sleeve.

I just bought a Nagaoka Kilavolt 103 on ebay and am waiting for it's arrival. They are much stronger than the Zerostats, but even these do their job.

Best,

cgb

roberts14
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Post by roberts14 » 27 Sep 2004 04:54

Hi, what I have done to eliminate the static problem around my turntable is to take one of those static-dissipative mats like those used for ESD-safe soldering stations or used as an electronic assembly workmat and place it directly under the turntable. These mats are available at most large electronic supply houses like Mouser and others. The static-dissipative mat has a snap-on type connector for connection to a grounding wire. It is recommended the mat be connected to a true earth ground such as an 8 ft. ground rod driven into the earth as close as possible to the mat. My turntable happens to sit on a shelf near a window so I was able to run a fairly short wire out the window directly to a ground rod. You should run a fairly heavy lead up from the ground rod. You can treat the lead coming up from the ground rod as a "star" grounding point for your stereo system. Depending on your electric code the ground rod should also have a wire outside running directly back to your service entrance ground also. Experiment with it connected and disconnected to your stereo system. Usually a good ground will help quiet any residual hum. What works for me is on dry days in the winter when I walk over carpeting up to the turntable I touch the mat first and any static charge buildup goes harmlessly to ground. I place a record on the mat for a few seconds after brushing it and the static charge disappears like magic. (Be sure the mat is clean and dustfree when doing this) You could also run a wire from a carbon brush to your grounding wire and this should instantly bleed off any static charge. (I haven't tried using a carbon brush yet) My records really build up strong static charges using a regular velvet-type brush before I added the grounding mat. You can't beat having a real ground connection to an outside ground rod for eliminating the static problem. Hope these suggestions may help.

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