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Vibration and Turntable

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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby eddie edirol » 23 Sep 2013 16:57

If I cant put my speakers on sorbathane because of literal rocking issues, then I will have to make a frame to suspend the turntable with rubber bands. I havent really been able to test the system at high volume yet, so I suspect the feedback issues could come back. rubber bands wont be pretty, but I think I can design something that will look a little less than gauche.

Keep in mind fellas, I cant alter the 2nd floor apt because its a rental. Im in a 1950s house with wooden floor.

I cant put concrete on top of my system rack, but I might be able to put the rack on a concrete block. I can probably only go 2 inches thick at the most before it gets too heavy to lug around. I can easily get flat bricks to put under the 3 legs of the rack and under the two speakers.

Would flat bricks work? Could I eliminate the rubber band under the turntable if I do this? Maybe the innertube trick?
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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby dlaloum » 23 Sep 2013 17:30

A flat 1" thick paver, 2' square, sitting on 2" diam. Sorbothane pads did magic for me...
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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby cafe latte » 23 Sep 2013 23:17

dlaloum wrote:I am not so sure....

Gallo Ref 3 / 3.1 / 3.2 were all on spikes.

As part of the upgrade to Ref3.5 Anthony Gallo put the latest version on a soft polymer pad (not clear whether it is sorbothane) - concensus is that the end result is a noticeable improvement!!

The logic behind it still escapes me - but it may be that the absorption of negative vibrations ends up being a greater positive than the loss of ultimate stability - a compromise?

I think as long as the turntable support is not allowing the table to twist I think isolation pads will be a benefit as I recently found out. Stopping vibrations from speakers getting back to the stylus even with the turntable wall mounted as mine is needed isolation pads. The problem with spikes is you are making the shelf part of the plinth.
On my recent trip to Brisbane the missus found this shop called Daiso Japan (mostly full of Cr@p in my opinion but she liked it :roll: ). While she was shopping I had a look round myself and found some packets of shockproof pads. I dont remember the price but it was only a couple of dollars for a pack of 4 slightly sticky soft blue squares. I tried them out the other day and they work a treat, no feedback what so ever. Anyone in Aus who wants a cheap isolation solution you wont get much cheaper than this.
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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby eddie edirol » 24 Sep 2013 04:05

hey CL, what is the original intended use for the shockproof pads you bought? Im sure they are available outside Australia.
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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby awty » 24 Sep 2013 07:23

dlaloum wrote:I am not so sure....

Gallo Ref 3 / 3.1 / 3.2 were all on spikes.

As part of the upgrade to Ref3.5 Anthony Gallo put the latest version on a soft polymer pad (not clear whether it is sorbothane) - concensus is that the end result is a noticeable improvement!!

The logic behind it still escapes me - but it may be that the absorption of negative vibrations ends up being a greater positive than the loss of ultimate stability - a compromise?


They say the base is made from Garolite which is a fibre glass and epoxy resin, with some Dermsol gel (what ever that is) applied to the base. Damn I was going to use resin and clay mix on my last speaker build and thought why bother. I did fill the bottom compartment with 20 kgs of sand though.
I've made 2 plinth using polyester resin and bentonite clay and its incredible how much vibration they suck up. The last one I made I used squash balls in between the plinth and some resin and clay cups as feet. I can tap the shelf and dont get any feed back with a stationary stylus on the record and the volume up high.
I also used 3mm Sorbothane in between the top and base plate on my scan dyna deck (standard plinth) to further isolate the 2, was getting a bit of vibration through, but none now. Its bolted together so there is a bit of pressure on the sorbathene.
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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby cafe latte » 24 Sep 2013 08:08

eddie edirol wrote:hey CL, what is the original intended use for the shockproof pads you bought? Im sure they are available outside Australia.

On the front of the pack it says to resist earthquake :shock: On the back it mentions them being under washing machines or fridges or even just under tv, or bookshelves probably for the earthquake thing.
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Chris
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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby awty » 24 Sep 2013 10:28

cafe latte wrote:On the front of the pack it says to resist earthquake :shock: On the back it mentions them being under washing machines or fridges or even just under tv, or bookshelves probably for the earthquake thing.
Regards
Chris


Earthquakes in Ravenshoe?
Or is that just for when the cattle truck goes by.
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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby cafe latte » 26 Sep 2013 00:30

awty wrote:
cafe latte wrote:On the front of the pack it says to resist earthquake :shock: On the back it mentions them being under washing machines or fridges or even just under tv, or bookshelves probably for the earthquake thing.
Regards
Chris


Earthquakes in Ravenshoe?
Or is that just for when the cattle truck goes by.

:lol: No I bought the pads in Brisbane from Daiso which is a shop that sells Japanese stuff, mostly junk kind of a Japanese version of Overflow, but these pads are a bargain IMO.
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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby KentT » 27 Sep 2013 04:07

Turntable must be isolated far from bass efficient loudspeakers, wood floors, gimpy feet, refrigerators and air handling systems to eliminate or reduce feedback. Thorens, Rega, and 99.9 percent of 3 spring suspended turntables and unipivot arms do not perform well in such conditions. For those, you need a professional Idler or DD turntable with a heavy platter, big motor, in a heavy plinth with lots of mass inside. As I must do.
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Re: Vibration and Turntable

Postby Trackside » 27 Sep 2013 08:47

KentT wrote:Turntable must be isolated far from bass efficient loudspeakers, wood floors, gimpy feet, refrigerators and air handling systems to eliminate or reduce feedback. Thorens, Rega, and 99.9 percent of 3 spring suspended turntables and unipivot arms do not perform well in such conditions. For those, you need a professional Idler or DD turntable with a heavy platter, big motor, in a heavy plinth with lots of mass inside. As I must do.

Dont'r agree - you need insane amounts of mass to isolate against external LF energy which is often impractical in a domestic situation. Also suspended sub-chassis designs and Rega designs are quite different. Suspended sub-chassis designs on their own are very effective at isolating the playing area from external LF energy whereas solid plinth decks like the Rega are not. If you have a 3 or 4 point suspended subchassis design deck then use a light and rigid support to minimise energy storage and let the internal suspension do it's job. For solid plinth designs couple them to enough mass to control self generated energy end resonances created by acoustic feedback and then isolate this mass with springs or air to isolate from any external LF energy.
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