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help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 05 Nov 2018 18:54
by dminches
My DP-60L has an issue. The platter won't spin on either 33 or 45. Sometimes when I power up the unit it will spin a tad but then stop.

I took off the bottom panel and I don't see any obvious signs of trouble. None of the capacitors look like they are leaking and there aren't any detached wires.

I really don't know where to start with this.

Could someone who is familiar with this type of situation point me in the right direction?

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 05 Nov 2018 23:08
by MandM
Unless you know how to trouble shoot electronics ( it's not a visual thing) you should take this to an experienced repair person.
Mike M

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 06 Nov 2018 16:14
by dminches
wrote:
05 Nov 2018 23:08
Unless you know how to trouble shoot electronics ( it's not a visual thing) you should take this to an experienced repair person.
Mike M
I do have the ability to replace caps, measure voltages, view things on an oscilloscope, etc. I am just looking for some initial direction.

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 07 Nov 2018 03:42
by cary114
Hi dminches, have you pulled the platter and removed the motor cover and cleaned and lubed the bearings for the platter. also hifi engine does have copies of the service manual and schematics for use.

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 08 Nov 2018 02:13
by EdAInWestOC
This subject is very old and worn out but I'll say something with the hope that someone actually listens.

Electrolytic capacitors can be way out of spec and the cause of serious problems without any visual clues. Power supply caps can leak when they are very old but they too can cause serious problems without showing any visual clues.

The electrolyte within the aluminum can dries out and the capacitance value or ESR radically changes over time. There is no guarantee that the capacitor will leak. None whatsoever. No electrolytic capacitor should be used if it is over 20 years old. Leaving them in a circuit is asking for problems.

That turntable was probably manufactured over 25 years ago and if you want to find a cause for your troubles look squarely at the electrolytic caps. Anyone who tells you to carefully measure each cap to find the bad one is not looking out for your best interest.

Ask yourself this question. Do you want a reliable, trouble free turntable? If the answer is yes then fully recap that table and finish the madness. There may be other things wrong with the table but you won't be able to effectively trouble shoot a circuit with a lot of old, out of spec caps on the PCB.

Eliminate the old caps and you can begin to see if there are other things wrong with the table. If you start to trouble shoot the table without recapping it first, you will likely be in for a long and frustrating experience.

There are approximately $40 worth of electrolytic capacitors on the PCB. Is $40 worth so many headaches? Who really cares exactly which cap caused most of the problems? I assume you just want a functioning turntable.

I restored an old DP-62L and have direct experience with what it takes to make a Denon quartz locked DD turntable reliable again.

1) Recap the PCBs
2) Makes all adjustments after the recap is done
3) Disassemble the main bearing, clean and inspect the thrust pad and ball. If there is any sign of wear the main bearing will have to be reworked. If not, relube the bearing with a good quality synthetic grease and reassemble the bearing
4) Disassemble, clean, relube and adjust the play for all of the tonearm bearings.
5) Repeat all adjustments after all of the mechanical items have been addressed.

A Denon turntable that is almost or over 30 years old requires significant effort to restore it. There are no short cuts. You may get away with a patch here or there but those items that were not addressed will come back to haunt you down the road. If you want a trouble free vintage turntable, a Denon is not a good choice. They are very nice turntables when functioning properly but they are not like an old Thorens with a AC or DC motor and a single belt to drive the platter.

A Denon turntable requires significantly more to make them function properly and there is that much more to go wrong. I am not a Denon hater. Quite the opposite, I still have my totally restored DP-62L in storage. If I get the extra room, I will pull that turntable out of storage and put it back in service.

Do you want a reliable, trouble free turntable? Restore it.

Ed

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 08 Nov 2018 13:51
by Legrace
Impeccable advice!

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 09 Nov 2018 04:22
by Licorice_Pizza
in regards to EdAInWestOC comment

[Eliminate the old caps and you can begin to see if there are other things wrong with the table. If you start to trouble shoot the table without recapping it first, you will likely be in for a long and frustrating experience.

There are approximately $40 worth of electrolytic capacitors on the PCB. Is $40 worth so many headaches? Who really cares exactly which cap caused most of the problems? I assume you just want a functioning turntable.

I restored an old DP-62L and have direct experience with what it takes to make a Denon quartz locked DD turntable reliable again.

1) Recap the PCBs
2) Makes all adjustments after the recap is done
3) Disassemble the main bearing, clean and inspect the thrust pad and ball. If there is any sign of wear the main bearing will have to be reworked. If not, relube the bearing with a good quality synthetic grease and reassemble the bearing
4) Disassemble, clean, relube and adjust the play for all of the tonearm bearings.
5) Repeat all adjustments after all of the mechanical items have been addressed. ]

Would you direct me to any helpful videos that show how this process of recap my Denon DP59L turntable? And also where would I buy the particular replacement capacitors and what would be the designated replacement?

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 12 Dec 2018 01:45
by EdAInWestOC
I'm not sure there are any videos to tell you how to recap a DP-60L. Recapping is a matter of desoldering the caps and soldering news ones in their place. If you have never done this get help from an electronics technician. It is a lot better to get help than to mess up the circuit board.

Ed

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 12 Dec 2018 02:54
by Spinner45
EdAInWestOC wrote:
12 Dec 2018 01:45
I'm not sure there are any videos to tell you how to recap a DP-60L. Recapping is a matter of desoldering the caps and soldering news ones in their place. If you have never done this get help from an electronics technician. It is a lot better to get help than to mess up the circuit board.

Ed
+1 there!

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 20 Dec 2018 15:31
by Audiodude
I just finished a full recap of my DP60L. I had a bit of trouble with it going off speed initially, but it seems to have cleared up. I am still waiting for replacements of the two speed control VR's. I believe that adjusting the VR's after recap (probably haven't been moved in 35 years) had something to do with it going off speed for a time. The service manual is available in the VE database and gives an accurate list of components. Unfortunately the service manual has no troubleshooting guide in it. It does give a list of voltages and where to check them. It's a wonderful table and I hope you get it spinning again.

Re: help Needed with Denon DP-60L

Posted: 20 Dec 2018 17:46
by Spinner45
Audiodude wrote:
20 Dec 2018 15:31
I just finished a full recap of my DP60L. I had a bit of trouble with it going off speed initially, but it seems to have cleared up. I am still waiting for replacements of the two speed control VR's. I believe that adjusting the VR's after recap (probably haven't been moved in 35 years) had something to do with it going off speed for a time. The service manual is available in the VE database and gives an accurate list of components. Unfortunately the service manual has no troubleshooting guide in it. It does give a list of voltages and where to check them. It's a wonderful table and I hope you get it spinning again.
The service manuals such as those included plenty of information - IF - you are an experienced service technician.
They were just not designed for "the common man".