Brunswick Seville

3 minute wonder
puzzlewuzzle
member
member
Posts: 44
Joined: 02 Jan 2017 20:31

Brunswick Seville

Post by puzzlewuzzle » 22 Jan 2020 14:22

Posting pictures of my Brunswick Seville.
I picked this up at a used furniture store in inoperable condition.
The legs were cut down many Moons ago but otherwise in beautiful condition.
I had the spring mechanism repaired and wow, what sound the Brunswick Seville has!!
Enjoying many 78's on the Seville Model.
Attachments
fullsizeoutput_cae.jpeg
(296.93 KiB) Downloaded 114 times
IMG_2769.JPG
(297.53 KiB) Downloaded 112 times
fullsizeoutput_cb2.jpeg
(354.85 KiB) Downloaded 114 times

Coffee Phil
vinyl addict
vinyl addict
United States of America
Posts: 5913
Joined: 20 Sep 2008 08:22
Location: California

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by Coffee Phil » 22 Jan 2020 18:40

Hi puzzlewuzzle,

Very nice! Congratulations.

Phil
puzzlewuzzle wrote:
22 Jan 2020 14:22
Posting pictures of my Brunswick Seville.
I picked this up at a used furniture store in inoperable condition.
The legs were cut down many Moons ago but otherwise in beautiful condition.
I had the spring mechanism repaired and wow, what sound the Brunswick Seville has!!
Enjoying many 78's on the Seville Model.

josephazannieri
long player
long player
United States of America
Posts: 2935
Joined: 20 Apr 2008 06:01
Location: Norwalk,Ohio,USA

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by josephazannieri » 22 Jan 2020 20:21

Yo puzzlewizzle:

Nice looking gramophone. This is one of those special ones with a relatively large wooden horn. It also has the additional horn extensions, which should provide additional low frequency range. In my true cobbler fashion I suggest that you might be able to get a little more volume and low frequency extension by spreading the horn extension doors to form a rough hornlike extension and putting wood covers on the top and bottom of the Horn, giving a little bit more horn area at the mouth. I do not suggest that you butcher the thing or drive nails into it, because it has such a nice appearance, but I just can't help but wonder...

I suppose you could build a bug extension for the horn that is separate from the gramophone and then just push the extension up to the front of the Brunswick so that the extension is added to the horn. I have seen some really huge old gramophones with really LARGE mouths on the horns, but you can't move them. I am told that they give great volume and pretty good bass, even with electrically recorded 78s.

And good luck and Hi, Phil from the old horn cobbler himself,

Joe Z.

Coffee Phil
vinyl addict
vinyl addict
United States of America
Posts: 5913
Joined: 20 Sep 2008 08:22
Location: California

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by Coffee Phil » 22 Jan 2020 23:01

Hi Joe,

Good to hear from you. Interesting concept. You may get me into buying these old record players and trying to "hot rod " them.

You may find this Nimbus Prima Voce horn interesting: https://www.wyastone.co.uk/prima-voce-series

Open the link and scroll down until you see it in it's magnificent glory.

Phil

josephazannieri wrote:
22 Jan 2020 20:21
Yo puzzlewizzle:

Nice looking gramophone. This is one of those special ones with a relatively large wooden horn. It also has the additional horn extensions, which should provide additional low frequency range. In my true cobbler fashion I suggest that you might be able to get a little more volume and low frequency extension by spreading the horn extension doors to form a rough hornlike extension and putting wood covers on the top and bottom of the Horn, giving a little bit more horn area at the mouth. I do not suggest that you butcher the thing or drive nails into it, because it has such a nice appearance, but I just can't help but wonder...

I suppose you could build a bug extension for the horn that is separate from the gramophone and then just push the extension up to the front of the Brunswick so that the extension is added to the horn. I have seen some really huge old gramophones with really LARGE mouths on the horns, but you can't move them. I am told that they give great volume and pretty good bass, even with electrically recorded 78s.

And good luck and Hi, Phil from the old horn cobbler himself,

Joe Z.

Bob Dillon
senior member
senior member
United States of America
Posts: 829
Joined: 03 Mar 2019 20:22

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by Bob Dillon » 22 Jan 2020 23:50

Can buy for a song old copies of those Nimbus 'Prima Voce' CD's that utilized that horn setup. Something in that setup was bass deficient, or just wasn't captured well by the mic's or whatever. Looks good, sounds not so good. I tried to like them and just couldn't.

puzzlewuzzle
member
member
Posts: 44
Joined: 02 Jan 2017 20:31

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by puzzlewuzzle » 23 Jan 2020 00:50

That Prima Voce is one big horn!
Not sure I have the room for that in my little house.
The Brunswick Seville has no volume control...other than the cabinet doors, but the volume is quite sufficient and I am thrilled with the sound quality.
I am trying different needles for sound variability.

The wooden horn in the Seville is a beauty. Very well crafted.
Some sort of horn extension (other than the cabinet doors) would probably make a nice improvement to sound quality.

Bob Dillon
senior member
senior member
United States of America
Posts: 829
Joined: 03 Mar 2019 20:22

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by Bob Dillon » 23 Jan 2020 01:09

puzzlewuzzle wrote:
23 Jan 2020 00:50

Some sort of horn extension (other than the cabinet doors) would probably make a nice improvement to sound quality.
No it wouldn't. The best way to optimize sound quality on the Sevllle is a reproducer in tip top shape and the horn having no splits, loose seams, etc. of any kind. Cobbling together some extra 'horn extension' would be fool's errand.

puzzlewuzzle
member
member
Posts: 44
Joined: 02 Jan 2017 20:31

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by puzzlewuzzle » 23 Jan 2020 04:08

I did some work on the reproducer to replace the old stiff gaskets with very nice results.
An extra reproducer I have does not equal the original on the Seville.
ok - no horn mods...

puzzlewuzzle
member
member
Posts: 44
Joined: 02 Jan 2017 20:31

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by puzzlewuzzle » 23 Jan 2020 04:14

the Seville has a Brunswick Panatone metal diaphragm reproducer. to me sounds better than the Ultona mica diaphragm reproducer...

Coffee Phil
vinyl addict
vinyl addict
United States of America
Posts: 5913
Joined: 20 Sep 2008 08:22
Location: California

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by Coffee Phil » 23 Jan 2020 17:53

Hi Bob,

While that monster horn is magnificent to behold, and if I had something analogous to Jay Leno's garage for my record playing stuff I would want to have it, I thought the notion was silly. I have to believe that a good modern electrical cartridge with the correct stylus with proper EQ could beat it at much less cost.

If I can find the CDs, I will give them a listen.

Phil
Bob Dillon wrote:
22 Jan 2020 23:50
Can buy for a song old copies of those Nimbus 'Prima Voce' CD's that utilized that horn setup. Something in that setup was bass deficient, or just wasn't captured well by the mic's or whatever. Looks good, sounds not so good. I tried to like them and just couldn't.

Bob Dillon
senior member
senior member
United States of America
Posts: 829
Joined: 03 Mar 2019 20:22

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by Bob Dillon » 23 Jan 2020 18:01

The covers have an integral look : https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R ... =nc&_oac=1

Acoustical era records are better heard through the Nimbus "Ambisonic" process than electrical. They're all of opera singers. The CD's aren't produced anymore.

Coffee Phil
vinyl addict
vinyl addict
United States of America
Posts: 5913
Joined: 20 Sep 2008 08:22
Location: California

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by Coffee Phil » 23 Jan 2020 20:09

Hi Bob,

Those recording which you linked seem like music worth having and the price is right. I believe I'll bid on some.

Can one assume that all the Nimbus recordings labeled Prima Voce were done with the big acoustic setup? I see one there of Marian Anderson. I know that her active career was after electrical recording. It would seem especially silly to copy such recordings with that acoustic setup.

Phil

Bob Dillon wrote:
23 Jan 2020 18:01
The covers have an integral look : https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R ... =nc&_oac=1

Acoustical era records are better heard through the Nimbus "Ambisonic" process than electrical. They're all of opera singers. The CD's aren't produced anymore.

Bob Dillon
senior member
senior member
United States of America
Posts: 829
Joined: 03 Mar 2019 20:22

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by Bob Dillon » 23 Jan 2020 20:45

Coffee Phil wrote:
23 Jan 2020 20:09

Can one assume that all the Nimbus recordings labeled Prima Voce were done with the big acoustic setup? I see one there of Marian Anderson. I know that her active career was after electrical recording. It would seem especially silly to copy
If it's sourced from 78 RPM, I think so. Most of what Nimbus issued were acoustical records. Marian Anderson made a handful of acoustically records early on, but you are right that she is largely recorded in the electrical era. I never heard the Nimbus Marian Anderson disc.

I did have this one though.

That O Lola is an extract from the complete recorded Cavalleria Rusticana, conducted by the composer in the recording studio in 1940. It's an electrical recording of course, as rendered here though the big Nimbus acoustic horn in their "Ambisonic" chamber. It may sound OK until you hear the same recording transferred on modern gear, (as I own on a Naxos CD, engineered by Ward Marston) and then you realize that the Nimbus just sounds rather hollow and where's the bass ? I don't mean to pick on the Nimbus Prima Voce series too much though. They still sound better than many muddy sounding LP transfers of old that are floating around out there. BTW, I seem to remember reading that Nimbus used cactus thorn needles for their transfers on the big horn machine which was an British EMG phonograph at it's base.

Bob Dillon
senior member
senior member
United States of America
Posts: 829
Joined: 03 Mar 2019 20:22

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by Bob Dillon » 23 Jan 2020 21:25

puzzlewuzzle wrote:
23 Jan 2020 04:14
the Seville has a Brunswick Panatone metal diaphragm reproducer. to me sounds better than the Ultona mica diaphragm reproducer...
Probably an aluminum diaphragm, same as the Victor Orthophonic phonograph. Mica can degrade too.

josephazannieri
long player
long player
United States of America
Posts: 2935
Joined: 20 Apr 2008 06:01
Location: Norwalk,Ohio,USA

Re: Brunswick Seville

Post by josephazannieri » 24 Jan 2020 02:31

Yo all you horny guys and girls (I can't resist sinking beneath myself):

I played that Nimbus recording of Benjamino Gigli. I was particularly impressed with the sound of the voice. That Nimbus playback horn is really big, a little less than 20 feet long, but I don't know the size of the mouth. I believe it's the size of the mouth that will determine the lowest frequency that the horn can reproduce. They are right that the sound is really natural.

I'll bet that the full recording of Cavalleria is really something, having been conducted by the composer, Pietro Mascagni, who died in 1945. As a side issue, which Phil knows about, I am fascinated by recordings of music performed or conducted by the composer. Such a recording provides a glimpse into the composer's view of tempi and dynamics that transcends the notations in the score. Wonder how the recording, which would have been an old-fashioned disc master job, would have sounded played on modern equipment. I share Phil's views on using modern equipment to play 78s, but I wonder how the Brunswick would do playing modern 78s, since it does have an aluminum diaphragm, which should give good reproduction of mids and highs, particularly sibilants.

I certainly would not suggest butchering puzzlewuzzle's beautiful Brunswick by cobbling something onto the front of it that would result in messing with that gorgeous cabinet. But if there were a way to add to the horn by pushing an additional length of horn and a larger mouth up to the horn, it might be interesting to hear the change in sound. It could be made out of a couple of sheets of cheap oriented strand board, which sells for about $15.00 a 4 x 8 sheet. I'd be game for it if the Brunswick were mine, but it's not. And of course, you'd have to bring the thing into the room where the Brunswick sits, which might disrupt domestic tranquility. As a crusty old bachelor, I don't have to worry about such things.

And good luck to all from that rambling old phono-cobbler,

Joe Z.

Post Reply