78 really wore out

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cary114
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78 really wore out

Post by cary114 » 28 Feb 2019 03:28

The last several days I have been ripping some of my 78's. So I came up to a Capitol Peggy Lee with about the last half of the record grooves were literally wore off of the disc. I guess that Peggy Lee singing "Waiting For The Train To Come In" was very popular. The flip side does have wear but it was recordable.

Cary

Coffee Phil
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Re: 78 really wore out

Post by Coffee Phil » 28 Feb 2019 05:04

Hi Cary,

Back when those Peggy Lee records came out there were still plenty of those acoustic record players in use. I had one myself. By the fourties 78 RPM records were a mature technology and the players had way more finese than the old acoustic machines had and the shellac records no doubt had less abrasive stuff in the mix to give less noise. This was good with the contemporary machines but I don’t think those records could stand up to the old machines. There is no telling what your Peggy Lee record was played on.

I am now on my second copy of “Rondevous With Peggy Lee” on 78. I bought my first copy at a thrift store and while all of the records would play they were pretty rough. I found a much better copy of the album at the Capital Public Radio used record sale and while it is not pristene, it is quite listenable and I even made a CD copy which is in my car changer and I enjoy it often.

Phil

cary114
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Re: 78 really wore out

Post by cary114 » 28 Feb 2019 22:27

Hi Phil

Yeah I was thinking the same thing. I was just so surprised at how much damage there was. I have a couple of the acoustic console models a Brunswick 271 and a RCA VV something I can't remember all of it that requires a complete restoration. I have been going to auctions and picking up boxes of 78's and 33's lately sure is cheaper that way. I am digitizing right now 78's using a AT-LP120USB, it has been a workhorse for this purpose. A lot of music and a few other things to get done. I have been averaging 15 minutes per song so I think it is going to take me awhile.

Cary

Bob Dillon
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Re: 78 really wore out

Post by Bob Dillon » 04 Mar 2019 21:27

Coffee Phil wrote:
28 Feb 2019 05:04
Hi Cary,

Back when those Peggy Lee records came out there were still plenty of those acoustic record players in use. I had one myself. By the fourties 78 RPM records were a mature technology and the players had way more finese than the old acoustic machines had and the shellac records no doubt had less abrasive stuff in the mix to give less noise. This was good with the contemporary machines but I don’t think those records could stand up to the old machines. There is no telling what your Peggy Lee record was played on.

I am now on my second copy of “Rondevous With Peggy Lee” on 78. I bought my first copy at a thrift store and while all of the records would play they were pretty rough. I found a much better copy of the album at the Capital Public Radio used record sale and while it is not pristene, it is quite listenable and I even made a CD copy which is in my car changer and I enjoy it often.

Phil
I'm also not an advocate of playing 1940's or 50's records on an acoustic machine with a steel needle. Just like you said, less abrasive was used and the records suffer more wear. Also the later records can have a higher volume level and / or wider frequency range that the old acoustic reproducers were not really equipped to handle. Later records that were recorded with more high frequency content can have those more delicate HF groove modulations stripped away by a steel needle and mechanical reproducer. I'm not into playing any rare records or really mint records with a steel needle, period, no matter what era they were produced. Modern playback gear for me.

Some get around the issue by using thorn needles on an acoustic phono, which have a softer output and are gentler on records, but can also leave a residue in the grooves that is hard to remove.

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Re: 78 really wore out

Post by Bob Dillon » 11 Mar 2019 20:31

cary114 wrote:
28 Feb 2019 03:28
The last several days I have been ripping some of my 78's. So I came up to a Capitol Peggy Lee with about the last half of the record grooves were literally wore off of the disc. I guess that Peggy Lee singing "Waiting For The Train To Come In" was very popular. The flip side does have wear but it was recordable.

Cary
Apropos of maybe nothing, you can get that track from the original lacquer session disc in the Capitol Collectors Series CD of Peggy Lee. The booklet says that WFTTCI reached # 4 on the charts in 1945. The Collectors Series was a well done series from the early 1990's. Capitol cut their takes to 33 1/3 rpm session discs, then dubbed them to 78 masters in the pre-tape era. The SQ difference can be striking. Those Capitol 78's are common and cheap and fun to play though. Johnny Mercer, Pied Pipers, Jo Stafford and all that stuff.

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Re: 78 really wore out

Post by cary114 » 12 Mar 2019 01:37

Hi Bob, Yes I could get a lot of those from other sources in good condition, but where is the fun in that. Though I am still recording my 78's I do stumble across a couple every now and then that have not been transferred which surprises me when it happens. And you are defiantly right how fun those Capitol 78's are fun to play. I also had fun with my stack of Decca's that I have done.

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