How much cleaning is too much for a 7" 45

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cdhumiston
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Joined: 18 Aug 2013 06:21

How much cleaning is too much for a 7" 45

Post by cdhumiston » 01 Sep 2013 06:47

To what degree do most 45 collectors go to in cleaning for instance? Can I do well with a spin clean and the proper mix of liquid goodies. Or must I have a 4-6 hundred dollar RCM with a auto spin and a vacuum? Most of the 45's I've rescued lately are severely molded, scratched and such, but still play through quite well. How many systems and how much money should one invest? Most of the RCM's are made for 12" LP's and have few if any attachments for 7" records. Bottom line is spending 1000's in cleaning equipment going to greatly improve the sound of a standard 45

Thoughts?...

Chris

JaS
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Re: How much cleaning is too much for a 7" 45

Post by JaS » 01 Sep 2013 08:45

Worn and scratched records can only be improved so much with cleaning. If you want to know if it's worth getting a vacuum type cleaner (they do leave less crud in the grooves), you could always find a shop that does cleaning, ask what machine they use and try them with a few?

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JaS

eddie edirol
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Re: How much cleaning is too much for a 7" 45

Post by eddie edirol » 08 Sep 2013 20:08

I think it depends on how much tolerance you plan to ratio to your cleaning efforts. If you actually get an okki nokki for example, and expect the 45s to be spotless when youre done, then I think youd be expecting too much. Most of those discs that are moldy are prolly too far gone for that type of effort. Styrene vinyl will prolly ekbed the mold in the grooves and be unremovable. I just saw a youtube video on a guy powerwashing his record and it works, but i think it was just for surface dust. Then he repaired deep sounding scratches with 1500 grit sandpaper. (The scratch wasnt deep) the dull patch he created on the record he fixed with compound and a respray. The album sounded great afterwards. So it depends on how far you want to go to save records that you could potentially buy in better condition, and how much sweat equity you want to invest. I say look on youtube for vids on how to clean and repair severe scratches and mold and see if you want to go that far.

If you want to do the work and avoid buying an rcm, i say go for it.

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