My Mid 1970's Motorola Amplifier

amplifiers, receivers and loudspeakers
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MichaelAlanSmith251981
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My Mid 1970's Motorola Amplifier

Post by MichaelAlanSmith251981 » 04 Jan 2020 01:49

My el cheapo GPX Mp3 speaker system I had used for my turntable, 8 Track, cassette and CD player got shorted out so I dusted off my old Motorola FH201 Stereo Receiver that was my parents. The research for the manufacturing date was around the 1974 era.
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Tinkaroo
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Re: My Mid 1970's Motorola Amplifier

Post by Tinkaroo » 04 Jan 2020 09:08

It was great that you found something at hand that you could use to keep your music playing. =D>

You can either clean it up a bit, and replace the burned out bulbs or perhaps find another vintage receiver down the road and keep this one as a spare.

You may want to check out the Vintage Receiver or Cheapskates threads in this subforum:
viewtopic.php?f=85&t=67559

KentT
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Re: My Mid 1970's Motorola Amplifier

Post by KentT » 13 Jan 2020 03:57

Your amplifier is no newer than 1974. As Matsushita bought Quasar, and Motorola got out of consumer electronics production. Your amplifier/receiver is related to a 1972-1974 Motorola unit found in one of their last console Stereo systems. And it is USA made, by the way, and high quality for what it is.

MichaelAlanSmith251981
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Re: My Mid 1970's Motorola Amplifier

Post by MichaelAlanSmith251981 » 18 Jan 2020 01:16

KentT wrote:
13 Jan 2020 03:57
Your amplifier is no newer than 1974. As Matsushita bought Quasar, and Motorola got out of consumer electronics production. Your amplifier/receiver is related to a 1972-1974 Motorola unit found in one of their last console Stereo systems. And it is USA made, by the way, and high quality for what it is.

Thank you for information on it as the information online is spotty at best.

MichaelAlanSmith251981
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Location: Indiana

Re: My Mid 1970's Motorola Amplifier

Post by MichaelAlanSmith251981 » 18 Jan 2020 01:18

Tinkaroo wrote:
04 Jan 2020 09:08
It was great that you found something at hand that you could use to keep your music playing. =D>

You can either clean it up a bit, and replace the burned out bulbs or perhaps find another vintage receiver down the road and keep this one as a spare.

You may want to check out the Vintage Receiver or Cheapskates threads in this subforum:
viewtopic.php?f=85&t=67559
Thanks for the heads up.

josephazannieri
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Re: My Mid 1970's Motorola Amplifier

Post by josephazannieri » 18 Jan 2020 03:32

Yo MichaelAlanSmith251981:

Looking at your pictures, it appears that you have a Motorola AM-FM receiver from mid-'70's. It does not appear to have a phono input, but it does have a tape input. To get better FM reception, take the metal clip that wraps around the power cord and clip it under one of the screws labeled "FM antenna" If one of the FM antenna screws in labeled " ground", fasten the clip to the other screw. This will get you decent FM reception in an urban or suburban area. If you are in a rural area, you may need to buy a folded-dipole FM antenna, or one of those amplified TERK antennas and hook it to the FM antenna terminals through a 300-ohm matching transformer.

Do you have the original speakers? If you don't you will need to find speakers that have high efficiency because all of these inexpensive receivers that use RCA plugs for speaker outputs are not very powerful, probably about 5 watts a channel. You may be able to plug the 8-track player into it and get some vintage music that way.

If you want to hook up a record player to it, you should be able to plug the turntable from your old GPX system into the inputs labeled "phono L" and "phono R". These inputs are probably designed for ceramic cartridges like that on your GPX turntable, and will likely work for you. You should check the stylus, and you might want to replace it if you are going to start playing records through this system.

Welcome to the forum, and I hope that you get a good result from the Motorola. Any further questions about hooking up speakers, just ask away. You will find good advice and respectful treatment here. And good luck from the old electronic improviser who can't say anything in less than 3 paragraphs,

Joe Z.

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