daily cleaning of albums

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SpiderFloyd
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daily cleaning of albums

Post by SpiderFloyd » 27 Jun 2018 06:17

Hi all, looking for some advice on how others clean their albums before they drop the stylus on them. I'm a Discwasher addict from the 1970's and dampen my classic Discwasher with D4+ and spin the table with my finger to clean it, and at the end of the listen I do the same before I flip it or sleeve it.
My question, how do you do this? Spin the table with the power of the TT motor or with the power of your finger? And do you just use the brush or with liquid every time? Am I being compulsive, or am I increasing the life of my stylus and vinyl collection?

sunderwood
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Re: daily cleaning of albums

Post by sunderwood » 01 Jul 2018 13:27

I clean all my records, new or used, with my vpi 16.5 before I play them for the first time. After that I use an audioquest brush to wipe it while the motor is spinning the platter before I set the needle down. Keeping the needle and record clean will insure that both last as long as they possibly can.

IndigoRock2001
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Re: daily cleaning of albums

Post by IndigoRock2001 » 04 Jul 2018 19:54

Sorry but I don't know the name of the thing I use. It's like a tonearm with a carbon fiber brush where the needle would be. (I subsequently found the name after posting this. It's called an (Antistatic Record Cleaning Arm) I have it attached to the 45 spindle and that sits in the 45 spindle hole on the side of the TT opposite to where the actual tone arm is. I clean the brush with a little stylus brush every time I play a side. It tracks with the stylus and no matter how clean a record looks it always finishes with a little load of dust and very fine dust at the end of a play. My records usually sound completely dust free, I mean they sound as clean as a CD! I'm surprised more people don't consider this thing absolutely essential to their complete setup.
I have had to modify it a little. It has the same tracking problems that a stylus has. It needs something to work as an anti-skate and another thing to stop it from proceding across the label after play and dumping it's load of dust on the other side of the record. The second thing is very simple. I cut off one end of a q-tip cotton swab and wedged the other end into the crack where the 45 spindle sits in the body of the TT. I placed it so that the stick of the swab sticks up and blocks the Cleaning Arm from proceding across the label. It's easy to adjust by simply tilting it back and forth. I have it set to stop the arm/brush so that it sits in the final center groove. Done. Easy. The anti-skate is another matter. I got it just about right after a few days of adjusting it. It is the kind of twist tie used on electronics cords (they are springier and more resiliant than the kind used on bread wrappers) It is folded or bent roughly in half, and one end is inserted into the same 45 spindle crack where I put the arm stopper. A bit of duct tape holds it in place. It forms a kind of weak spring. The other end is bent to just touch the back of the dust brush tone-arm counter weight. As the record plays the back of the arm (the counter weight) moves outward as the brush part moves inward toward the label on it's pivot. The more it moves the stronger the pressure of the twist-tie spring. This works fine it just requires repeated adjustment of the spring to get it just right. Then you're set to go.
I got this thing on Amazon. It should cost about $15. It comes in a green box with french writing on it. I found it on Ebay this morning but it was $15 with $25 shipping coming from Australia. Too expensive, I guess unless you live in Australia.
As I said I don't know why these things aren't something everyone has and consideres essential as I do. If you start with a new disk there's no need to wipe them at all, ever. An old disk will of course need an initial cleaning. Hope you can find one and it works as well for you as it does for me.
Indi
Last edited by IndigoRock2001 on 04 Jul 2018 20:25, edited 2 times in total.

IndigoRock2001
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Re: daily cleaning of albums

Post by IndigoRock2001 » 04 Jul 2018 20:06

Oh I forgot something really important about the tone-arm like record cleaning brush. It has a wire which plugs into it's mount (the pivot) you attach the other end of this wire to a ground (earth). Since there is a static field on the surface of the vinyl disk the grounding of the brush causes it to essentially suck the positively charged dust from the surface of the disk onto the brush, and it sticks there.
Oh I found it on Amazon it's called a 'Antistatic Record Cleaning Arm' just plug that into Anazon's search and it will pop up along with a couple of other things. Buena fortuna!
Indi

sunderwood
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Re: daily cleaning of albums

Post by sunderwood » 04 Jul 2018 21:43

I used to never clean new records, but started due to reading that records are not pressed in a dust free environment like cds are. It is just a precautionary thing on my part. I used to have one of those record cleaning arms a lot of years ago that I got from Radio shack. I seem to remember it being good at picking up surface dust. I don't remember it having a wire on it like the one from Amazon. No more than it costs I think it would be worth trying.

sunderwood
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Re: daily cleaning of albums

Post by sunderwood » 04 Jul 2018 22:29

IndigoRock2001 wrote:Sorry but I don't know the name of the thing I use. It's like a tonearm with a carbon fiber brush where the needle would be. (I subsequently found the name after posting this. It's called an (Antistatic Record Cleaning Arm) I have it attached to the 45 spindle and that sits in the 45 spindle hole on the side of the TT opposite to where the actual tone arm is. I clean the brush with a little stylus brush every time I play a side. It tracks with the stylus and no matter how clean a record looks it always finishes with a little load of dust and very fine dust at the end of a play. My records usually sound completely dust free, I mean they sound as clean as a CD! I'm surprised more people don't consider this thing absolutely essential to their complete setup.
I have had to modify it a little. It has the same tracking problems that a stylus has. It needs something to work as an anti-skate and another thing to stop it from proceding across the label after play and dumping it's load of dust on the other side of the record. The second thing is very simple. I cut off one end of a q-tip cotton swab and wedged the other end into the crack where the 45 spindle sits in the body of the TT. I placed it so that the stick of the swab sticks up and blocks the Cleaning Arm from proceding across the label. It's easy to adjust by simply tilting it back and forth. I have it set to stop the arm/brush so that it sits in the final center groove. Done. Easy. The anti-skate is another matter. I got it just about right after a few days of adjusting it. It is the kind of twist tie used on electronics cords (they are springier and more resiliant than the kind used on bread wrappers) It is folded or bent roughly in half, and one end is inserted into the same 45 spindle crack where I put the arm stopper. A bit of duct tape holds it in place. It forms a kind of weak spring. The other end is bent to just touch the back of the dust brush tone-arm counter weight. As the record plays the back of the arm (the counter weight) moves outward as the brush part moves inward toward the label on it's pivot. The more it moves the stronger the pressure of the twist-tie spring. This works fine it just requires repeated adjustment of the spring to get it just right. Then you're set to go.
I got this thing on Amazon. It should cost about $15. It comes in a green box with french writing on it. I found it on Ebay this morning but it was $15 with $25 shipping coming from Australia. Too expensive, I guess unless you live in Australia.
As I said I don't know why these things aren't something everyone has and consideres essential as I do. If you start with a new disk there's no need to wipe them at all, ever. An old disk will of course need an initial cleaning. Hope you can find one and it works as well for you as it does for me.
Indi
There is a Bags Unlimited installation video on you tube that says that if it travels too quickly toward the center that you need to lessen the downforce.

SpiderFloyd
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Re: daily cleaning of albums

Post by SpiderFloyd » 08 Jul 2018 03:14

IndigoRock2001 wrote:Oh I forgot something really important about the tone-arm like record cleaning brush. It has a wire which plugs into it's mount (the pivot) you attach the other end of this wire to a ground (earth). Since there is a static field on the surface of the vinyl disk the grounding of the brush causes it to essentially suck the positively charged dust from the surface of the disk onto the brush, and it sticks there.
Oh I found it on Amazon it's called a 'Antistatic Record Cleaning Arm' just plug that into Anazon's search and it will pop up along with a couple of other things. Buena fortuna!
Indi
I remember my folks TT having a brush that hung out over the top of the tonearm and did it's thing before the needle passed...going to be Googling that 'Antistatic Record Cleaning Arm', Thanks!

Slavikcc
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Re: daily cleaning of albums

Post by Slavikcc » 11 Jul 2018 13:44

For all of my used records and some new records, I simply clean them with my Nitty Gritty 1.5Fi RCM, using the LAST Cleaning Fluid and store them in MoFi inner sleeves. Before dropping the stylus to play them, I use my anti-static carbon fiber brush by using this method below:


ripblade
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Re: daily cleaning of albums

Post by ripblade » 12 Jul 2018 01:54

sunderwood wrote:
IndigoRock2001 wrote:Sorry but I don't know the name of the thing I use. It's like a tonearm with a carbon fiber brush where the needle would be. (I subsequently found the name after posting this. It's called an (Antistatic Record Cleaning Arm) I have it attached to the 45 spindle and that sits in the 45 spindle hole on the side of the TT opposite to where the actual tone arm is. I clean the brush with a little stylus brush every time I play a side. It tracks with the stylus and no matter how clean a record looks it always finishes with a little load of dust and very fine dust at the end of a play. My records usually sound completely dust free, I mean they sound as clean as a CD! I'm surprised more people don't consider this thing absolutely essential to their complete setup.
I have had to modify it a little. It has the same tracking problems that a stylus has. It needs something to work as an anti-skate and another thing to stop it from proceding across the label after play and dumping it's load of dust on the other side of the record. The second thing is very simple. I cut off one end of a q-tip cotton swab and wedged the other end into the crack where the 45 spindle sits in the body of the TT. I placed it so that the stick of the swab sticks up and blocks the Cleaning Arm from proceding across the label. It's easy to adjust by simply tilting it back and forth. I have it set to stop the arm/brush so that it sits in the final center groove. Done. Easy. The anti-skate is another matter. I got it just about right after a few days of adjusting it. It is the kind of twist tie used on electronics cords (they are springier and more resiliant than the kind used on bread wrappers) It is folded or bent roughly in half, and one end is inserted into the same 45 spindle crack where I put the arm stopper. A bit of duct tape holds it in place. It forms a kind of weak spring. The other end is bent to just touch the back of the dust brush tone-arm counter weight. As the record plays the back of the arm (the counter weight) moves outward as the brush part moves inward toward the label on it's pivot. The more it moves the stronger the pressure of the twist-tie spring. This works fine it just requires repeated adjustment of the spring to get it just right. Then you're set to go.
I got this thing on Amazon. It should cost about $15. It comes in a green box with french writing on it. I found it on Ebay this morning but it was $15 with $25 shipping coming from Australia. Too expensive, I guess unless you live in Australia.
As I said I don't know why these things aren't something everyone has and consideres essential as I do. If you start with a new disk there's no need to wipe them at all, ever. An old disk will of course need an initial cleaning. Hope you can find one and it works as well for you as it does for me.
Indi
There is a Bags Unlimited installation video on you tube that says that if it travels too quickly toward the center that you need to lessen the downforce.
I have one on both my TT. I find they work better if the record rotates into the pivot instead of the usual arrangement. Also works better if the bristles are groomed straight up and down. If they slope one way or the other they'll skate over the groove walls.

I have no tracking issues with mine, but I wish the stand had an integral arm rest like any other tonearm. You have to either pull the wand off or let it swing in the breeze between record changes.

reynolds617
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Re: daily cleaning of albums

Post by reynolds617 » 26 Jul 2018 18:31

Here's my ritual:

All records new to my collection get put on the VPI 16.5, get shots with the Milty anti-static gun, then dry cleaned with a Hunt EDA brush. Net new vinyl gets the one-step treatment (I use all Audio Intelligent fluids made by Osage; they just work). I then bag the record(s) itself/themselves in Sleeve City (easier to get the record back into the sleeve than the MoFi products which are flimsier in my experience) inner sleeves, then bag the sleeve in a Sleeve City outer sleeve which helps to make the album artwork "pop' because of its transparency. Again, tried MoFi, I found it to be an inferior product. My collection isn't huge, so I'm OK with the additional investment.

For used records I use the three step fluid process from Audio Intelligence on the VPI or if really dirty I add the "Tough Job" as an initial step (i.e. fourth step) before the three step process. I clean just the one time with wet process depending on condition, bag it, then use a Hunt EDA brush to dry clean prior to playing.

The key with wet cleaning is to let the fluids do the work. Activate them by lightly tapping, then brush into the grooves by letting the brush sit vertically (very light pressure) and then sweep gently against the rotation of the RCM to get it down into the grooves. I then typically turn the VPI turntable off, and let the soapy fluids just sit for a minute or two for each stage. I take that time to prepare the sleeves or just sit and watch the fluids do their job.

When dry cleaning, prior to playing let it go around a rotation or two at about the 8 o'clock position, then gently flick your wrist to get the most dust off. I tried the Audioquest antistatic brush, but found it wasn't really substantial enough to do a good job removing dust. There just aren't enough bristles. I highly recommend the Hunt EDA model. Does a way better job.

If you do the wet cleaning correctly and let the activated fluids sit for long enough, you should only have to do it once. Bag it, and Bob's your uncle. :D

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