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Ain't No Mountain High Enough

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Ain't No Mountain High Enough

Postby DarthMaul » 15 Jan 2018 22:53

I have a question to ask.

When I was transferring the Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell album "United" onto my computer, there was a dropout in the left channel at the start of "Ain't No Mountain High Enough". I made a decision to use audacity to stream record from YouTube the segment without the dropout (using a YouTube page that contains the recording of the song that most closely matches the record), and carefully used that to repair the dropout properly. Should I have not done this for copyright reasons and left the dropout as is? I still have the original recorded file from the record and can revert it back to the way it was, but I'd rather hear the song without the dropout. I tried repairing the dropout in Adobe Audition straight from the original file, but the result was never good. Hopefully another copy of the record might lack the dropout. Currently the resulting file is so good I can't even tell the dropout was there.

I deleted my first post of this topic and moved it to Vinyl Ripping.
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Re: Ain't No Mountain High Enough

Postby rich12 » 19 Jan 2018 16:00

If you spliced in a microsecond of sound from a recording that isn't your own, no one who might give you trouble cares, and they have no way to identify it either.
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Re: Ain't No Mountain High Enough

Postby Sterling1 » 19 Jan 2018 20:33

DarthMaul wrote:I have a question to ask.

When I was transferring the Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell album "United" onto my computer, there was a dropout in the left channel at the start of "Ain't No Mountain High Enough". I made a decision to use audacity to stream record from YouTube the segment without the dropout (using a YouTube page that contains the recording of the song that most closely matches the record), and carefully used that to repair the dropout properly. Should I have not done this for copyright reasons and left the dropout as is? I still have the original recorded file from the record and can revert it back to the way it was, but I'd rather hear the song without the dropout. I tried repairing the dropout in Adobe Audition straight from the original file, but the result was never good. Hopefully another copy of the record might lack the dropout. Currently the resulting file is so good I can't even tell the dropout was there.


I deleted my first post of this topic and moved it to Vinyl Ripping.


What a great post. I too have had probems like yours. Recently, I ripped a 1962 Glen Gould album of Bach tunes. One of those tunes did not come through with the noise reduction I thought I had applied to it and it seemed to have a drop out too. Rather than re-rip, I just looked for the tune in the iTunes Store, and I bought it for $1.29. I then added it to my playlist and removed the defective file. This was better overall, for a multitude of reasons, than doing the re-rip. This is not the first time I have filled in with a cut or two from the iTunes Store, as some of my LP's have cuts which are damaged beyond what noise reduction can fix. At any rate it's a cheap solution. You might want to try it out.
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Re: Ain't No Mountain High Enough

Postby DarthMaul » 20 Jan 2018 03:16

Sterling1 wrote:
DarthMaul wrote:I have a question to ask.

When I was transferring the Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell album "United" onto my computer, there was a dropout in the left channel at the start of "Ain't No Mountain High Enough". I made a decision to use audacity to stream record from YouTube the segment without the dropout (using a YouTube page that contains the recording of the song that most closely matches the record), and carefully used that to repair the dropout properly. Should I have not done this for copyright reasons and left the dropout as is? I still have the original recorded file from the record and can revert it back to the way it was, but I'd rather hear the song without the dropout. I tried repairing the dropout in Adobe Audition straight from the original file, but the result was never good. Hopefully another copy of the record might lack the dropout. Currently the resulting file is so good I can't even tell the dropout was there.


I deleted my first post of this topic and moved it to Vinyl Ripping.


What a great post. I too have had probems like yours. Recently, I ripped a 1962 Glen Gould album of Bach tunes. One of those tunes did not come through with the noise reduction I thought I had applied to it and it seemed to have a drop out too. Rather than re-rip, I just looked for the tune in the iTunes Store, and I bought it for $1.29. I then added it to my playlist and removed the defective file. This was better overall, for a multitude of reasons, than doing the re-rip. This is not the first time I have filled in with a cut or two from the iTunes Store, as some of my LP's have cuts which are damaged beyond what noise reduction can fix. At any rate it's a cheap solution. You might want to try it out.

I tried doing that from Amazon. The stereo copy of the song I purchased from there wasn't good enough at the start of the song to patch the recording from the record compared to the one YouTube video I came across: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqfgSYaWRFc
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