What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

radio, tape, stands and accessories
Tinkaroo
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Tinkaroo » 18 Jan 2019 09:15

BoblK wrote:
18 Jan 2019 02:19
Tinkaroo wrote:
17 Dec 2018 16:11
The impedance on the Koss Pro 4AAA from the mid 1970s is listed at 250 ohms and the same would apply to the Pro 4AA. That 250 ohms seems pretty standard for many headphones by a lot of manufacturers.

An interesting article on headphones impedance:
https://www.cnet.com/news/headphone-buy ... ce-models/

I had a set of the Pro4AA's back in the early 70's up through about '82. Your right, the impedance was 250 ohms. The original 4AA's sounded great. I have not heard the current 4AA's. From what I have read they don't sound as good as the originals.
My issue with the current Pro 4AA headphones is that they are head crushers and very uncomfortable to wear.

The older circa mid 1970s 4AAA sound better and were more comfortable, but the original earpads tend to have turned to rock, and Koss no longer supplies pads for them. You need to remove the old rock hard pads and add a more comfortable replacement. Other than that the rest of the headphones have stood up very well.

jdjohn
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by jdjohn » 19 Jan 2019 02:10

I think we're allowed to post about non-audio putzing projects here, right?

Our clothes washer stopped between cycles a couple of nights ago. When the rinse cycle finished, the machine stopped, and wouldn't drain...nor subsequently spin. Research indicated that (among other things) the lid switch might be bad, so I started by removing and testing that, and sure enough it was bad. Here's the switch after removal:
IMAG1464.jpg
(136.1 KiB) Downloaded 70 times
There was no continuity between the wire terminals (on the back) when the lever was flipped. Luckily, I was able to find a new replacement switch. But at the same time, I was curious as to what went bad in such a relatively simple switch, so of course I had to open it up :D Here is a pic of the problem - the weld holding these two metal contacts had let go, and when under pressure (i.e., when the switch cover is on), the contacts spread apart, so no continuity.
IMAG1466.jpg
(70.48 KiB) Downloaded 65 times
Since I don't own a welder, and solder wouldn't stick to any of that metal :? I had to order a new one. I probably could have rigged-up something to make the contacts stick together, but since a replacement only cost $18 shipped, I went with that. Installed the replacement tonight, and it's working properly again :)

The funny thing was that yours truly was doing a load of laundry when the problem occurred, so I had to tell my wife, "This is a sign. I'm just not meant to do laundry." She didn't really agree with me, but it was worth a shot :lol:

Spinner45
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Spinner45 » 19 Jan 2019 03:45

jdjohn wrote:
19 Jan 2019 02:10
I think we're allowed to post about non-audio putzing projects here, right?

Our clothes washer stopped between cycles a couple of nights ago. When the rinse cycle finished, the machine stopped, and wouldn't drain...nor subsequently spin. Research indicated that (among other things) the lid switch might be bad, so I started by removing and testing that, and sure enough it was bad. Here's the switch after removal:
IMAG1464.jpg
There was no continuity between the wire terminals (on the back) when the lever was flipped. Luckily, I was able to find a new replacement switch. But at the same time, I was curious as to what went bad in such a relatively simple switch, so of course I had to open it up :D Here is a pic of the problem - the weld holding these two metal contacts had let go, and when under pressure (i.e., when the switch cover is on), the contacts spread apart, so no continuity.
IMAG1466.jpg
Since I don't own a welder, and solder wouldn't stick to any of that metal :? I had to order a new one. I probably could have rigged-up something to make the contacts stick together, but since a replacement only cost $18 shipped, I went with that. Installed the replacement tonight, and it's working properly again :)

The funny thing was that yours truly was doing a load of laundry when the problem occurred, so I had to tell my wife, "This is a sign. I'm just not meant to do laundry." She didn't really agree with me, but it was worth a shot :lol:
I disabled that lousy lid switch on my older model Maytag.
So now it runs even with the lid up. - sometimes I toss in more stuff if I forget something.
That switch is for "child safety" of course, as is the locking lid on some machines.
They have to include that because of "new laws".
Pain in the butt, easily solved.

jdjohn
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by jdjohn » 19 Jan 2019 03:56

Spinner45 wrote:
19 Jan 2019 03:45
jdjohn wrote:
19 Jan 2019 02:10
I think we're allowed to post about non-audio putzing projects here, right?

Our clothes washer stopped between cycles a couple of nights ago. When the rinse cycle finished, the machine stopped, and wouldn't drain...nor subsequently spin. Research indicated that (among other things) the lid switch might be bad, so I started by removing and testing that, and sure enough it was bad. Here's the switch after removal:
IMAG1464.jpg
There was no continuity between the wire terminals (on the back) when the lever was flipped. Luckily, I was able to find a new replacement switch. But at the same time, I was curious as to what went bad in such a relatively simple switch, so of course I had to open it up :D Here is a pic of the problem - the weld holding these two metal contacts had let go, and when under pressure (i.e., when the switch cover is on), the contacts spread apart, so no continuity.
IMAG1466.jpg
Since I don't own a welder, and solder wouldn't stick to any of that metal :? I had to order a new one. I probably could have rigged-up something to make the contacts stick together, but since a replacement only cost $18 shipped, I went with that. Installed the replacement tonight, and it's working properly again :)

The funny thing was that yours truly was doing a load of laundry when the problem occurred, so I had to tell my wife, "This is a sign. I'm just not meant to do laundry." She didn't really agree with me, but it was worth a shot :lol:
I disabled that lousy lid switch on my older model Maytag.
So now it runs even with the lid up. - sometimes I toss in more stuff if I forget something.
That switch is for "child safety" of course, as is the locking lid on some machines.
They have to include that because of "new laws".
Pain in the butt, easily solved.
Yeah, I thought about using an unfolded a paper clip between the wire leads and by-passing the switch altogether, but worried about the heat in the clip from the resistance.

Spinner45
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Spinner45 » 19 Jan 2019 04:00

jdjohn wrote:
19 Jan 2019 03:56
Spinner45 wrote:
19 Jan 2019 03:45
jdjohn wrote:
19 Jan 2019 02:10
I think we're allowed to post about non-audio putzing projects here, right?

Our clothes washer stopped between cycles a couple of nights ago. When the rinse cycle finished, the machine stopped, and wouldn't drain...nor subsequently spin. Research indicated that (among other things) the lid switch might be bad, so I started by removing and testing that, and sure enough it was bad. Here's the switch after removal:
IMAG1464.jpg
There was no continuity between the wire terminals (on the back) when the lever was flipped. Luckily, I was able to find a new replacement switch. But at the same time, I was curious as to what went bad in such a relatively simple switch, so of course I had to open it up :D Here is a pic of the problem - the weld holding these two metal contacts had let go, and when under pressure (i.e., when the switch cover is on), the contacts spread apart, so no continuity.
IMAG1466.jpg
Since I don't own a welder, and solder wouldn't stick to any of that metal :? I had to order a new one. I probably could have rigged-up something to make the contacts stick together, but since a replacement only cost $18 shipped, I went with that. Installed the replacement tonight, and it's working properly again :)

The funny thing was that yours truly was doing a load of laundry when the problem occurred, so I had to tell my wife, "This is a sign. I'm just not meant to do laundry." She didn't really agree with me, but it was worth a shot :lol:
I disabled that lousy lid switch on my older model Maytag.
So now it runs even with the lid up. - sometimes I toss in more stuff if I forget something.
That switch is for "child safety" of course, as is the locking lid on some machines.
They have to include that because of "new laws".
Pain in the butt, easily solved.
Yeah, I thought about using an unfolded a paper clip between the wire leads and by-passing the switch altogether, but worried about the heat in the clip from the resistance.
Better solution - simply strip and splice the two wires, use a "wire nut" to bind them, and then wrap it in electrical tape to avoid moisture getting in.

jdjohn
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by jdjohn » 19 Jan 2019 04:04

Spinner45 wrote:
19 Jan 2019 04:00
jdjohn wrote:
19 Jan 2019 03:56
Spinner45 wrote:
19 Jan 2019 03:45


I disabled that lousy lid switch on my older model Maytag.
So now it runs even with the lid up. - sometimes I toss in more stuff if I forget something.
That switch is for "child safety" of course, as is the locking lid on some machines.
They have to include that because of "new laws".
Pain in the butt, easily solved.
Yeah, I thought about using an unfolded a paper clip between the wire leads and by-passing the switch altogether, but worried about the heat in the clip from the resistance.
Better solution - simply strip and splice the two wires, use a "wire nut" to bind them, and then wrap it in electrical tape to avoid moisture getting in.
Best solution - strip, splice, and solder the wires together with some heat-shrink tubing covering the splice.

Spinner45
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Spinner45 » 19 Jan 2019 04:50

jdjohn wrote:
19 Jan 2019 04:04
Spinner45 wrote:
19 Jan 2019 04:00
jdjohn wrote:
19 Jan 2019 03:56

Yeah, I thought about using an unfolded a paper clip between the wire leads and by-passing the switch altogether, but worried about the heat in the clip from the resistance.
Better solution - simply strip and splice the two wires, use a "wire nut" to bind them, and then wrap it in electrical tape to avoid moisture getting in.
Best solution - strip, splice, and solder the wires together with some heat-shrink tubing covering the splice.
I was going to suggest that, not knowing how picky you are with your "putzing" LOL! :lol:

jdjohn
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by jdjohn » 19 Jan 2019 04:57

Moderate OCD

EDIT: I do choose to use silver-containing solder, so there's that.

Gelid
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Gelid » 19 Jan 2019 06:02

I've had a Westinghouse 6500-watt portable generator that I've been gradually integrating into a semi-permanent fixture.

Over the passed few months I've picked up a 150-foot cord, had a transfer switch panel installed on the breaker panel, and now I'm working on a method to run the exhaust out through the wall of the wooden garden shed I am now keeping it in.

Found a video on Youtube that someone made. I modified what he had, to suit what I had to work with here and at the local hardware store.



Coolest thing about this method is how the duct fastens to the muffler with the magnet.

My insulated double-walled pipe that goes through the wall is slightly different. I could only find a 4" galvanized duct cap, so I had to use 4" semi-rigid ducting. I had a drier vent with a 3" tube on it, so I bought a 4" to 3" reducer, and cut another length of 4" duct to fit snugly over the length between the shroud and the reducer, wrapped the 3" inner duct with fiberglass insulation and slid it into the 4" duct. It was a real pain getting that together!

Now, all that's left is to saw a 4" hole in the wall of the shed, then enlarge it 1/8"-1/4" more somehow to fit the rib on the reducer through it, and screw the sheet metal to the inside / outside.

I'm curious as to how the semi-rigid duct will hold up to the heat. Also, the aluminum 3" dryer vent. I'm planing on needing to replace the semi-rigid after every power-outage, but wondering just how long it can take the heat. I do have spares in case it is a miserable failure, and need to keep it going.

I plan on making a more strudy system with stove pipe, but this should do for now.

Spinner45
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Spinner45 » 19 Jan 2019 06:29

Gelid wrote:
19 Jan 2019 06:02
I've had a Westinghouse 6500-watt portable generator that I've been gradually integrating into a semi-permanent fixture.

Over the passed few months I've picked up a 150-foot cord, had a transfer switch panel installed on the breaker panel, and now I'm working on a method to run the exhaust out through the wall of the wooden garden shed I am now keeping it in.

Found a video on Youtube that someone made. I modified what he had, to suit what I had to work with here and at the local hardware store.



Coolest thing about this method is how the duct fastens to the muffler with the magnet.

My insulated double-walled pipe that goes through the wall is slightly different. I could only find a 4" galvanized duct cap, so I had to use 4" semi-rigid ducting. I had a drier vent with a 3" tube on it, so I bought a 4" to 3" reducer, and cut another length of 4" duct to fit snugly over the length between the shroud and the reducer, wrapped the 3" inner duct with fiberglass insulation and slid it into the 4" duct. It was a real pain getting that together!

Now, all that's left is to saw a 4" hole in the wall of the shed, then enlarge it 1/8"-1/4" more somehow to fit the rib on the reducer through it, and screw the sheet metal to the inside / outside.
Might I make a suggestion here....
For the exit hole in the shed wall, I'd feel safer if it was made like this:

If the exhaust is to be the 4" size, I'd make a 8x8" (or even larger) square opening in the wall, with a sheet metal plate on either side, with the 4" feed-through centered on that sheet.
Then, once one side of the plate is secured to the wall, add fiberglass insulation around the opening, sandwiching it inside the wall with the other plate.
This in effect will keep the wall from getting hot from the exhaust, preventing a possible fire on the wall.
And you know that the exhaust will eventually become very hot, so will any ducting.

Gelid
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Gelid » 19 Jan 2019 06:41

Spinner45 wrote:
19 Jan 2019 06:29
Might I make a suggestion here....
For the exit hole in the shed wall, I'd feel safer if it was made like this:

If the exhaust is to be the 4" size, I'd make a 8x8" (or even larger) square opening in the wall, with a sheet metal plate on either side, with the 4" feed-through centered on that sheet.
Then, once one side of the plate is secured to the wall, add fiberglass insulation around the opening, sandwiching it inside the wall with the other plate.
This in effect will keep the wall from getting hot from the exhaust, preventing a possible fire on the wall.
And you know that the exhaust will eventually become very hot, so will any ducting.
Brilliant! I was kind of iffy about the duct through the wall, but since this is a "functioning mock-up" I thought I'd just do what the video-guy did. The larger hole is a great idea that won't cost me any more time or money, and makes sense.

Like I said, I plan on beefing this up a bit with stove pipe after winter... I just want something now, in case we loose power in the coming snowstorm.

Thanks for the tip!

Tinkaroo
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Tinkaroo » 19 Jan 2019 09:04

The number one rule of putzing is "Safety First"! =D>

This is especially true in the last couple of examples where electricity, heat and exhaust fumes are concerned.

Good luck with the snow storm. [-o<

I have a wood stove which will take care of the heat and a small generator in case we lose power for more than a day or so. It's also good to have some filled emergency water containers, food, mechanical can opener, battery powered radio, flashlights, extra batteries etc.. I even have a small propane camp stove, I could cook on (outdoors of course)if needed, but I can also heat things on the wood stove if I lift the top.

A number of years back there was an ice storm in the Montreal area of Quebec which probably affected people in New England too. Some people were without power for up to six weeks during the winter. After that some people sought out a secondary source of heating that could run without power such as a wood stove/fireplace, or propane/natural gas heater/fireplace.

One word of caution is that in prolonged winter outages, some people have brought their gas barbecues indoors for heat and were overcome by monoxide fumes. They warn people not to do this, but there are always a few who didn't hear the message which is worth repeating.

Tinkaroo
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Tinkaroo » 19 Jan 2019 09:47

Here's Clint to tell us about another rule of putzing.
Clint Eastwood-Limitations.jpg
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BoblK
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by BoblK » 20 Jan 2019 02:12

Gelid wrote:
19 Jan 2019 06:41
Spinner45 wrote:
19 Jan 2019 06:29
Might I make a suggestion here....
For the exit hole in the shed wall, I'd feel safer if it was made like this:

If the exhaust is to be the 4" size, I'd make a 8x8" (or even larger) square opening in the wall, with a sheet metal plate on either side, with the 4" feed-through centered on that sheet.
Then, once one side of the plate is secured to the wall, add fiberglass insulation around the opening, sandwiching it inside the wall with the other plate.
This in effect will keep the wall from getting hot from the exhaust, preventing a possible fire on the wall.
And you know that the exhaust will eventually become very hot, so will any ducting.
Brilliant! I was kind of iffy about the duct through the wall, but since this is a "functioning mock-up" I thought I'd just do what the video-guy did. The larger hole is a great idea that won't cost me any more time or money, and makes sense.

Like I said, I plan on beefing this up a bit with stove pipe after winter... I just want something now, in case we loose power in the coming snowstorm.

Thanks for the tip!
You need a ceramic fire blanket. Using fiberglass insluation can be a potential hazard. People do use it but it can melt at much lower temps than a chimney fire. A ceramic insulation won't melt at 2100 deg F. A chimney fire can reach those temps.

Japi Roelofs
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Re: What Are You Putzing Around On These Days?

Post by Japi Roelofs » 22 Jan 2019 22:17

Last night I worked on the Philips 308 turntable I found in the dumpster a few weeks ago. It had the dreaded 'belt meltdown' that a lot of Philips turntables suffer from: belt turned to horrible black goo, the stuff gets all over everything and is incredibly hard to remove.

As a cleaner I used acetone, as it dissolves the goo rather quickly. It is very aggressive stuff and should not be used on plastic. I used q-tips dipped in acetone to clean everything, but I couldn't get to the recessed parts of the pulley where the belt rides. So I used an acetone soaked toothbrush on the running pulley. That was a mistake — drops of black goo all over the turntable. I cleaned it up with a paper towel, again with some acetone. That was an even bigger mistake :shock:
The acetone immediately wiped away the lettering on the top plate, and started to eat into the brushed aluminium finish. #-o

Another disappointment was the dust cover. I have succesfully brought back to life a fairly large amount of seemingly unsalvageable covers, by means of persistent (wet) sanding and polishing. Not this one though... apparently something had been lying on top of it and melted into the plastic. No matter how hard I sanded it, it remains visible. Bummer.

OK, so much for the looks. How about the workings? I did find a belt in my bag-o-belts that made it spin at the correct speed, motor is silent, no rubbing or funny noises. A cheap aftermarket conical stylus in the 500 cartridge, and away we go...
Horror! Shrill, distorded noise. Damn... The previous owner cut off the 5-pole DIN plug and putzed some cheap RCA plugs at the end of the cable. So I replaced the entire cable and added a ground wire.

Hooked it up once again, and finally, MUSIC. LMFAO, this dwarf-like turntable actually sounds really nice! Full bodied, balanced, with only a hint of sharpness. Because of all the setbacks I didn't expect anything anymore, and I guess that's what makes the music sound sweet like wine... Cheers.

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