Vinyl to CD

radio, tape, stands and accessories
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Blast from the past
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Vinyl to CD

Post by Blast from the past » 15 Jun 2008 02:17

Hey guys,
What software do you guys recomend to transfer Vinyl To CD? I Have a Windows XP machine. I'm using my Micro Seiki DD20 with a Preamp into the Soundblaster sound card. Doing this is all new to me, so any thoughts on this matter would be greatly appreciated.

Mike

JaS
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Post by JaS » 15 Jun 2008 08:31

Hi,
I use Adobe Audition, but the freeware program Audacity has much of the functionality and some useful online guides:

Audacity

Using Audacity to transfer LPs to CD

Just remember to save to uncompressed wav files and do any post-processing on a copy. Also, it's tempting to throw all sorts of filters at recordings to remove every trace of hiss, crackle and pop but the end result suffers. It's worth burning processed and unprocessed copies when you start off so you can listen on your main system to see what's needed.

Have fun!
JaS

LPspinner
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Post by LPspinner » 15 Jun 2008 10:54

Hi there "Blast from the past"…

Jas is pretty well on the money with the Audacity. Is small, light weight and best of all … it’s free.

You mentioned that you are using a “SoundBlaster” sound card; well so am I (I am using a Creative Labs - Sound Blaster Audigy). If you still have all your install discs or your Sound Blaster software installed you can also give Creative WaveStudio a go. This is the application I use to capture my audio samples, it works very well, It’s lightweight, doesn’t consume large amounts of system resources and it has a simple and easy to understand interface. It’s also handy for doing automated fade-in and fade-outs when later editing down tracks. Additionally; make sure you are using 16 bit by 44100 Hz for CD encoding, higher bit rates might sound tempting but quantization errors will creep in when you down sample for CD’s, unless you sample at exact multiples of 44100. Also be aware than not all sound blaster cards actually encode at 24 bit even though they say they do, They actually down sample and up-sample “on the fly” leaving a standard 16 bit wave file on the hard drive.

As I side comment or recommendation I have found Nero’s Wave Editor handy for detecting the inter-track silence and then quickly and painlessly dividing up one album side into the individual tracks. If Nero misses the track cut off you can quickly go in and move or delete the track marker before Nero does the final “track split” and generates the separate track files. I find the Nero utility really quick and the easiest to divide up the album side into tracks. The last thing you want to do is have a 45 minute album on your freshly burnt CD appear as one single track with no way of getting to the individual tracks.

Also I have found EAC (Exact audio copy) the best way to record a CD as it is the only software I know of that can completely eliminate the 2 second gap between tracks, Nero CD Creator always seems to want to add the 2 second gap between tracks and I can’t seem to turn this off. It’s not so much of an issue on popular LP’s but sometimes with classical Music when two tracks can seg-way from one movement directly into the next movement, the two second gap will tend to “Kill” the mood of the music.

I hope this helps:

LPSpinner.

Wulf

Post by Wulf » 15 Jun 2008 17:14

Eliminating the 2-second gap can be done using any software that can read and use a cue sheet. CDR-Win is my favourite.

Blast from the past
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Post by Blast from the past » 15 Jun 2008 17:30

Thanks guys,
I will give it a go. Great information from all.
Thanks,
Mike

Brian75
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Post by Brian75 » 17 Jun 2008 11:19

I use Steinberg's Wavelab for this. It will automatically split the tracks at specified silence points (if db drops below a user preset value). It will also write custom CD's that do not have to be Red Book compliant (minus the 2 second gaps). You can actually specify the amount of gap between each song before writing the disc. As an audio engineer, I use it for mastering... so it may not be the perfect solution for the casual xfer, but I do highly recommend it as well as the other softwares mentioned here.

Wulf

Post by Wulf » 17 Jun 2008 11:37

Perhaps I should have said BURNING software, this process isn't done in the recording, it's done at the stage of CD creation. In a cue sheet for, let's say, a DJ mix session or classical piece of several movements, it's common for the music to keep going seamlessly yet the player indexes the tracks in order.
The cue sheet uses the INDEX keyword to indicate the time-stamp or number of frames corresponding to the duration of that particular song, if the INDEX of the next song begins immediately after, there will be no gap in the recording. If you indicate 00:02:00 then 2 seconds of silence will be inserted. This will be done REGARDLESS of the content of the recording (i.e. audio files).

How to get the correct gap info?

What you need to do here is listen to each song in the audio recording application, and note the timestamp for the beginning and end of each song (use the marker function if there is one). You then use this information in the cue sheet to make the burn happen correctly. If you burn from discrete audio files, e.g. one per CD track, the TRACK keyword is used in the cue sheet and the 2-second gap is inserted automatically.

HTH

Werner
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Post by Werner » 17 Jun 2008 14:02

For correcting clicks and pops I use the very affordable
shareware ClickRepair:

http://wwwmaths.anu.edu.au/~briand/soun ... _info.html

I have tried many declickers, including expensive ones, and ClickRepair is
with a huge margin the best. In fact it is ridiculously good.




My transfer rig:

GyroDec/SME IV/Allaerts MC1b or
Gyro SE/RB-300/Benz MC Scheu

Trichord Dino+ or AQVOX Phono2Ci

Tascam DV-RA1000 used at 96kHz/24b or 44.1kHz/24b

Adobe Audition 1.5 + ClickRepair + homebrew EQ filters

CD authoring with Sonic Solutions, audio DVD-V authoring with Audio DVD Creator.

Brian75
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Post by Brian75 » 17 Jun 2008 15:33

"Tascam DV-RA1000 used at 96kHz/24b or 44.1kHz/24b"

Nice deck. :)

NewOldVinyl
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Post by NewOldVinyl » 20 Jun 2008 04:45

I've been trying ClickRepair and so far I think it's amazingly good. It puts all the other similar "consumer-grade" tools to shame.

Werner
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Post by Werner » 20 Jun 2008 09:25

Brian75 wrote: Nice deck. :)
Well ... if I lived in another era I would probably have an A77 or B77.

But the Tascam does not impart the same level of confidence. It is not built like a tank, makes funny noises, and is extremely fussy w.r.t. DVD+RW media. So far I have only a good success rate using specific Sony discs (and I hate buying Sony, they once sent a lawyer myways for me critisising SACD and DSD). With other discs the machine just crashes during recording. Total waste of time.

But it still beats moving the laptop over to the main system every time I want to copy an LP.

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Post by redstick » 08 Jul 2008 04:40

I have been using Audacity with no complaints

alphacourt
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Post by alphacourt » 08 Jul 2008 22:04

Thanks for the ClickRepair tip. Are the noise reduction tools better Audition's native NR tool?

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