Audio software

radio, tape, stands and accessories
joedisco
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Audio software

Post by joedisco » 15 Feb 2019 01:56

Hello all!
Is there a comercially available (or free :mrgreen: ) audio software in order to measure dB and frequency?
I have this app called Spectroid in my android phone and it gives you dB and a frequency chart.
But of course, I can not trust a smartphone microphone.
I just don't think a smartphone microphone is able to "detect" very high nor very low frequencies.
I guess smartphone microphones must be good for the human voice range and no more and that makes sense.
So I plan to buy a decent microphone.
Im not trying to do anything scientific. Im just curious and plan to play some music and see how it is represented in a frequency chart.
Nothing serious here, just playing....
Thanks!
(would the microphone that came with my Yamaha for calibration do??)

analogaudio
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Re: Audio software

Post by analogaudio » 17 Feb 2019 01:34

Perhaps it depends on the smartphone, some may have good quality microphones, I don't know, but it is worth investigating this before spending money on a separate mic.

If you decide to get serious then I can recommend True Audio True RTA software for the PC, it will give you a scientific tool that is easy to use and accurate, combined signal generator and real-time spectrum analyzer www.trueaudio.com

joedisco
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Re: Audio software

Post by joedisco » 18 Feb 2019 17:29

Thanks so much!
Will see if I can find tech specs for my smartphone mic, it is a Nokia 5
And that software looks interesting
Thanks again...

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Re: Audio software

Post by gofar99 » 18 Feb 2019 23:57

Hi I use True Audio RTA as well. With a laptop and calibrated mic. It will do an excellent job presenting the sound levels. If I recall correctly the cheapest one (might be free actually) does 1/3 octave. The next up 1/6 and finally 1/12. If all you want is a general sort of view of the sound the lowest one is not too bad. I use the middle version.

JoeE SP9
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Re: Audio software

Post by JoeE SP9 » 19 Feb 2019 18:48

I use a Umik 1 USB mic, REW (Room Equalization Wizard) and a laptop for the same purpose. REW is free. The calibrated Umik 1 is $75. I already had the laptop. The readings I get from REW and mic are used to adjust a DSP to smooth in room response. REW has a somewhat steep learning curve. However, IMO it's worth the effort to learn how to use it.

FWIW: I also use Audio Tool (free) for Android on my Amazon Fire tablet. It's not nearly as accurate as the Umik1 and REW. OTOH, it's quick to pull up and nice to look at. It also has many functions.

joedisco
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Re: Audio software

Post by joedisco » 20 Feb 2019 18:50

Thanks so much to all of you. I see now there are many options, will look for those mics...
By the way, I guess it is possible with any audio software you mention to analize a music file, lets say a FLAC file so play it in your Laptop through the audio software and see all of the frequency range.
This way you may compare it when the same file is played by your audio system and then music is detected by the mic and analyzed by the software so you can see what are you missing?
Ok, thanks all!

Sunwire
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Re: Audio software

Post by Sunwire » 20 Feb 2019 18:59

If you want to analyze audio files on your computer, Audacity (free) is very useful.
https://www.audacityteam.org/download/

JoeE SP9
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Re: Audio software

Post by JoeE SP9 » 20 Feb 2019 21:30

I use Audacity for "ripping" LP's to FLAC.

Sunwire
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Re: Audio software

Post by Sunwire » 20 Feb 2019 23:01

Yes, I use Audacity for ripping, too.

joedisco
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Re: Audio software

Post by joedisco » 21 Feb 2019 00:29

Sunwire wrote:
20 Feb 2019 18:59
If you want to analyze audio files on your computer, Audacity (free) is very useful.
https://www.audacityteam.org/download/
Great! Thanks!!

JoeE SP9
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Re: Audio software

Post by JoeE SP9 » 21 Feb 2019 00:36

joedisco wrote:
20 Feb 2019 18:50
Thanks so much to all of you. I see now there are many options, will look for those mics...
By the way, I guess it is possible with any audio software you mention to analize a music file, lets say a FLAC file so play it in your Laptop through the audio software and see all of the frequency range.
This way you may compare it when the same file is played by your audio system and then music is detected by the mic and analyzed by the software so you can see what are you missing?
Ok, thanks all!

If you rip to FLAC or another lossless file type you're not missing aanything. Why do you think they're called lossless?

joedisco
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Re: Audio software

Post by joedisco » 21 Feb 2019 23:25

JoeE SP9 wrote:
21 Feb 2019 00:36
joedisco wrote:
20 Feb 2019 18:50
Thanks so much to all of you. I see now there are many options, will look for those mics...
By the way, I guess it is possible with any audio software you mention to analize a music file, lets say a FLAC file so play it in your Laptop through the audio software and see all of the frequency range.
This way you may compare it when the same file is played by your audio system and then music is detected by the mic and analyzed by the software so you can see what are you missing?
Ok, thanks all!

If you rip to FLAC or another lossless file type you're not missing aanything. Why do you think they're called lossless?
Yes, you are right.
I think my post is confusing.
What I mean is I want to "analyze" a FLAC file played by the audio software and compare it against the sound waves produced by my sound sytem playing the very same FLAC file and then coming into the microphone.
For instance, I have some organ music in FLAC and Im curious to see if it "contains" very low frequencies. Let's say it does. Let's say when Im playing this FLAC file with my PC through the audio software it shows some 50hz waves at some point in time.
Now, play the very same FLAC file through my audio system and speakers and then "capture" the music with the microphone and put the software to analyze the sound waves produced by my speakers. Then see if at the same point in time my speakers are producing the same 50 hertz waves.
My speakers are rated to deliver as low as 40 hertz. But I wonder if it is true or not. Maybe it is just marketing.
If not, then turn on my subwoofer and see what happens.

JoeE SP9
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Re: Audio software

Post by JoeE SP9 » 22 Feb 2019 01:22

As long as the file is lossless you're not missing anything. Sure, there may be differences doing what you propose. What do you expect to hear with the sound in your room. Unless the system is equalized to provide flat in room response your idea is worthless in that there is no real comparison.

If you want to find out how low your speakers go in your room, get a calibrated mic and a copy of REW. Play some test tones and make some measurements.

joedisco
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Re: Audio software

Post by joedisco » 22 Feb 2019 20:14

JoeE SP9 wrote:
22 Feb 2019 01:22
As long as the file is lossless you're not missing anything. Sure, there may be differences doing what you propose. What do you expect to hear with the sound in your room. Unless the system is equalized to provide flat in room response your idea is worthless in that there is no real comparison.

If you want to find out how low your speakers go in your room, get a calibrated mic and a copy of REW. Play some test tones and make some measurements.
Thanks, that seems like a better approach, using test tones!

JoeE SP9
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Re: Audio software

Post by JoeE SP9 » 23 Feb 2019 17:07

FWIW: I use REW, a laptop, a calibrated mic and a DSP to flatten my system's in room response. Once the DSP is set there is no need to do any further adjusting. My preamp has no tone controls so I have no incentive to tweak anything. If I wanted to constantly tweak the sound I'd buy a Schiit Loki. It's a four band tone control. For tonal adjustments it's far more effective than tweaking a 10 band or more linear equalizer.

All to often linear equalizers end up with the good old smiley face. What's that about? The reason is usually stated that the setting is for poor recordings. Since when do all poor recordings need the same smiley face settings? :roll:

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