Homemade - Show us what you've made!

radio, tape, stands and accessories
Rymart96
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Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Rymart96 » 22 May 2018 17:20

So I saw a certain speaker stand online and couldn't really find anything on the market other than in America at a high price for a student like myself. Luckily the university technicians could help me out, I drew up the stands on CAD software and had it water-jet cut and bent for me before I finished them off with some paint. So overall it has cost me around £25
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Tonybro
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Tonybro » 22 May 2018 17:40

I like them. My only concern would be rigidity - as in, are they rigid?

Rymart96
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Rymart96 » 22 May 2018 18:14

This was also one of my concerns, due to the low cost of making them I thought I would go ahead with the design and try them out. They hold the speakers but do have a slight bend, similar to reviews I read on the branded one I saw

Gelid
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Gelid » 22 Jul 2018 06:37

I got this Sansui 210 that sounds good... clean pots and switches. Everything works on it.

Trouble with it is that something heavy had been sitting on it for quite a while, and bent down the wood case and thin top section of the aluminum faceplate. The wood sprung back almost all the way, but the faceplate had a clear dip in it.

I made these two simple jigs to hold the faceplate upright while I bent the top back to straight with a c-clamp.
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I broke the tinted plexi-glass covering the tuner dial trying to remove it so I could straighten the faceplate. No prob... I'll just get some smoked plexi and make another myself.

But now, I am making a new wooden case for it. The vinyl veneer is peeling in several places, and the wood isn't as flat as it really should be, so I bought some 3/8" plywood and cut the four panels, beveled the edges at the corner joints, and cut a relief in the front edges for the faceplate to nest in.
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Now, I need to figure out how to glue it all together!

I will be applying real wood veneer to the exterior.

BTW, I have never done woodworking like this before. I am a skilled machinist, and would have no problem making this out of steel or aluminum on a Bridgeport mill. Wood is too inconsistant for my standards, and I get frustrated trying to square up a piece of plywood with nothing but a table saw. Still, I think it will all go together straight and square.

Gelid
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Gelid » 22 Jul 2018 23:40

The assembly has begun. I have the top, bottom, and both sides glued. I have the whole box wrapped in 2"-wide strips of masking tape to keep the panels in position and prevent sliding in or out. It is braced between my saw fence and a few bricks to keep it square, and weighed on the top.
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Tomorrow I'll decide which side I'll use as the top, then glue in the heat shield and support brace, plus the upper 45-degree corner braces. You see the lowers in this photo. These I will reinforce with small brass screws later. I couldn't figure out a way to glue them first and clamp them, without interfering with the fit of the panels, so I glued them in after panels were together. I know they are pretty important for rigidity so I want to make sure they are on tight.

Gelid
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Gelid » 24 Jul 2018 19:33

I am starting to research how to apply the wood veneer and have discovered that the veneer should have been applied before the panels were cut to size. This is due to the necessary "balance" veneer that needs to be applied on the other side of each panel (the inside face) and also the clamping method needed to insure an excellent bond.

If I go with one wood veneer on the outside only, when it expands and contracts, it will warp the "core" 3/8" plywood. This is why the opposite side also needs a veneer.

If I ever do this again, I will rough the panels to about 1" oversize, apply the face veneer and balance veneer, clamp for 24 hrs, then cut to finish dimensions.

I could prob still apply the balance (inner) veneer, I just wanted to state this here now, in case anyone may be doing a similar proceedure.

Now, in the interest of time, I am considering going with vinyl woodgrain veneer instead of real wood.

Coffee Phil
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Coffee Phil » 26 Jul 2018 02:14

OK,

I built this a few years ago but since we now that have this "show and tell" string I'll show this:

[img]21426[/img]

My mono legacy phono stage is below the Roku Soundbridge. It can either pass both channels of my stereo cartridge to my stereo phono stage or sum them to mono, vertical or lateral, and offers a selection of bass turn and treble cut frequencies. It can also be flat with no EQ at all or convert the constant velocity of a magnetic cartridge to constant amplitude (like a ceramic) by selecting 700 Hz for both the bass turn and treble cut.

The schematic is below:

[img]18919[/img]

If you want to build one for your own use, feel free and enjoy, but if you are going to sell them we should talk.

Phil

Gelid
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Gelid » 28 Jul 2018 02:28

Coffee Phil wrote:OK,

I built this a few years ago but since we now that have this "show and tell" string I'll show this: ...My mono legacy phono stage is below the Roku Soundbridge.
Awesome, Phil! =D>


My project is stalled while I'm waiting for the wood veneer to be delivered. I couldn't find any wood or vinyl veneer locally that was wide enough to cover the width of the box.

While I wait, I'm sanding, applying woodfiller, then more sanding.

Spinner45
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Spinner45 » 28 Jul 2018 03:20

I built a type of "jukebox".
Mainly for outdoor events, block parties, and just for fun.
It Plays a stack of 10, 45 RPM records.
The record changer is a highly modified RCA Victor RP-190, with servo speed control, electronically-activated wireless remote "reject" control and anti-feedback suspension.
The record rack holds 68 disks.

This jukebox also has a CD/MP3 player, also remote controlled.
So I can burn a hundred songs or more on a disk and gives it hours of un-attended playback.
Along with all that, there's a microphone input, for making "announcements" or "sing-along" use.

The amplifier is a 200 watt SS unit, driving "4" 10-inch air-suspension woofers and "4" tweeters, 2 up front, 2 on the sides.

The cabinet lighting is both a sequential color array in the side pilasters, and a music-activated 4 channel "color organ" columm centered between the woofers up front. - Blue for bass notes, red for mid bass, green for voices, yellow for upper highs.
The hood also has lighting installed.

Of course it's on wheels, the damn thing got pretty hefty from all the building and bracing, and the hand-cut aluminum trim.

In use, it rattles all the tools in the garage. :shock:
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Coffee Phil
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Coffee Phil » 28 Jul 2018 06:50

Hi Spinner45,

Wow! I'm impressed. That is an impressive piece of work. You have an impresssive set of skills.

Please talk more about the RP190. I have one of those machines. Can you describe the speed control servo. I'm assuming you went to a DC motor. Is that so?

Phil
Spinner45 wrote:I built a type of "jukebox".
Mainly for outdoor events, block parties, and just for fun.
It Plays a stack of 10, 45 RPM records.
The record changer is a highly modified RCA Victor RP-190, with servo speed control, electronically-activated wireless remote "reject" control and anti-feedback suspension.
The record rack holds 68 disks.

This jukebox also has a CD/MP3 player, also remote controlled.
So I can burn a hundred songs or more on a disk and gives it hours of un-attended playback.
Along with all that, there's a microphone input, for making "announcements" or "sing-along" use.

The amplifier is a 200 watt SS unit, driving "4" 10-inch air-suspension woofers and "4" tweeters, 2 up front, 2 on the sides.

The cabinet lighting is both a sequential color array in the side pilasters, and a music-activated 4 channel "color organ" columm centered between the woofers up front. - Blue for bass notes, red for mid bass, green for voices, yellow for upper highs.
The hood also has lighting installed.

Of course it's on wheels, the damn thing got pretty hefty from all the building and bracing, and the hand-cut aluminum trim.

In use, it rattles all the tools in the garage. :shock:
jukebox_done1.jpg

Spinner45
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Spinner45 » 28 Jul 2018 07:18

Coffee Phil wrote:Hi Spinner45,

Wow! I'm impressed. That is an impressive piece of work. You have an impresssive set of skills.
Please talk more about the RP190. I have one of those machines. Can you describe the speed control servo. I'm assuming you went to a DC motor. Is that so?
Phil
The platter drive motor is simply a DC motor similar to the ones used in cassette decks, with an onboard PWM driver.
It drives the platter through a conventional single-tire idler system like on full size turntables - retracting the idler from the motor and platter when switched off.

Another small DC motor, with a planetary gear train, actuates the change cycle through a linkage, replacing the original "eccentric" idler cycle cam design.
Thus, it provides a positive "push pull" of the main cycle slide with no slippage or stalling.
All this is controlled by a set of microswitches for
(1) end-of-record sensing
(2) start-stop of the cycle motor
(3) Activating the "reject" function
And - a relay driven from a wireless receiver so I can "reject" a record from 40 feet away.

In operation, the changer appears to function just like it originally did, but with much less noise, exact speed, and lowered wow/flutter.

A "tuned" spring/silicone rubber suspension, along with a 10 pound weight, make it immune to feedback from those 4 big woofers below.

Coffee Phil
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Coffee Phil » 29 Jul 2018 18:51

Hi Spinner45,

My RP190 is much closer to OEM. I did replace the Lazy Susan ball thrust bearing for the platter with copper thrust washers to reduce rumble. Just the platter with no motor was noisy with the ball bearing assembly and became much quieter with the washers. With the OEM "idler" rebuilt by Voice of Music the speed is right on but there is noticeable rumble in stereo. In mono it is acceptable. How is your rumble in stereo and what did you do about the thrust bearing?

It turns out that the Lazy Susan bearing fit and works for the arm pivot. The friction seems much less and it works fine with a cheap magnetic cartridge.

Phil
Spinner45 wrote:
Coffee Phil wrote:Hi Spinner45,

Wow! I'm impressed. That is an impressive piece of work. You have an impresssive set of skills.
Please talk more about the RP190. I have one of those machines. Can you describe the speed control servo. I'm assuming you went to a DC motor. Is that so?
Phil
The platter drive motor is simply a DC motor similar to the ones used in cassette decks, with an onboard PWM driver.
It drives the platter through a conventional single-tire idler system like on full size turntables - retracting the idler from the motor and platter when switched off.

Another small DC motor, with a planetary gear train, actuates the change cycle through a linkage, replacing the original "eccentric" idler cycle cam design.
Thus, it provides a positive "push pull" of the main cycle slide with no slippage or stalling.
All this is controlled by a set of microswitches for
(1) end-of-record sensing
(2) start-stop of the cycle motor
(3) Activating the "reject" function
And - a relay driven from a wireless receiver so I can "reject" a record from 40 feet away.

In operation, the changer appears to function just like it originally did, but with much less noise, exact speed, and lowered wow/flutter.

A "tuned" spring/silicone rubber suspension, along with a 10 pound weight, make it immune to feedback from those 4 big woofers below.

Spinner45
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Posts: 2995
Joined: 01 Mar 2017 17:21

Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Spinner45 » 29 Jul 2018 21:22

Coffee Phil wrote:Hi Spinner45,

My RP190 is much closer to OEM. I did replace the Lazy Susan ball thrust bearing for the platter with copper thrust washers to reduce rumble. Just the platter with no motor was noisy with the ball bearing assembly and became much quieter with the washers. With the OEM "idler" rebuilt by Voice of Music the speed is right on but there is noticeable rumble in stereo. In mono it is acceptable. How is your rumble in stereo and what did you do about the thrust bearing?

It turns out that the Lazy Susan bearing fit and works for the arm pivot. The friction seems much less and it works fine with a cheap magnetic cartridge.

Phil
The RP-190 in my jukebox is wired for mono, with a Tetrad stereo cartridge tracking at 4 grams.
The tonearm horizontal pivot is friction-free because of an added slippery teflon washer.
The end-of-record trip is a super light microswitch to trigger the cycle motor.
I didn't feel "stereo" was needed for this application, since if used out on the street for a block party, stereo wouldn't matter to people.
The control preamp is mono, feeding into a dual-channel 100W/100W amp.
This of course minimizes any "rumble" factor, and as for the platter ball bearing, it's silent, with the addition of a silicone rubber "rumble" washer and a rubber platter mat.
Also, the audio system inputs (records, CD, microphone) are fed through a Sallen-Key 38DB/octave filter, effectively removing any audio content below 28Hz.
The end result is rumble/feedback-free at any volume.

Here are some "early on" photos of it that I took as I was building it...
JukeSpeakerPanel.jpg
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The large white lit panel is where the song title strips would go.
concept-garage.JPG
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Spinner45
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Spinner45 » 29 Jul 2018 21:35

And one more - a "profile" side view.
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Coffee Phil
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Re: Homemade - Show us what you've made!

Post by Coffee Phil » 30 Jul 2018 04:42

Hi Spinner45,

I did learn about the rumble washer thing (looking at a Dual service manual) when I was restoring my RP190 and probably should have done it, but the washers seemed to be a big improvement and the slight increase in friction did not hurt speed accuracy. I just wired mine for stereo since I wanted a stereo cartridge to make it stereo record safe. It will certainly play a stereo record in stereo and it is not awful but I switch to mono as stereo is not worth the noticeable rumble which I get in stereo.

After I did the RP190 I got a NOS Admiral 78 changer. I found it to have a rumble washer but it is cork and at ~ 70 years old not in good shape. I should replace it with silicone.

Phil
Spinner45 wrote:
Coffee Phil wrote:Hi Spinner45,

My RP190 is much closer to OEM. I did replace the Lazy Susan ball thrust bearing for the platter with copper thrust washers to reduce rumble. Just the platter with no motor was noisy with the ball bearing assembly and became much quieter with the washers. With the OEM "idler" rebuilt by Voice of Music the speed is right on but there is noticeable rumble in stereo. In mono it is acceptable. How is your rumble in stereo and what did you do about the thrust bearing?

It turns out that the Lazy Susan bearing fit and works for the arm pivot. The friction seems much less and it works fine with a cheap magnetic cartridge.

Phil
The RP-190 in my jukebox is wired for mono, with a Tetrad stereo cartridge tracking at 4 grams.
The tonearm horizontal pivot is friction-free because of an added slippery teflon washer.
The end-of-record trip is a super light microswitch to trigger the cycle motor.
I didn't feel "stereo" was needed for this application, since if used out on the street for a block party, stereo wouldn't matter to people.
The control preamp is mono, feeding into a dual-channel 100W/100W amp.
This of course minimizes any "rumble" factor, and as for the platter ball bearing, it's silent, with the addition of a silicone rubber "rumble" washer and a rubber platter mat.
Also, the audio system inputs (records, CD, microphone) are fed through a Sallen-Key 38DB/octave filter, effectively removing any audio content below 28Hz.
The end result is rumble/feedback-free at any volume.

Here are some "early on" photos of it that I took as I was building it...
JukeSpeakerPanel.jpg
The large white lit panel is where the song title strips would go.
concept-garage.JPG

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