modern quality

name that tune
backtotheblack
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modern quality

Post by backtotheblack » 05 Jan 2020 00:17

is it just me or is modern vinyl shocking quality.

180g vinyl but put in card inners which shed dust all over the surface never mind all the surface storage marks along with when you try and get it out of the too tight card inners it scratches.

whats the point in buying brand new vinyl when you need to put it on the RCM to play it.

when the avg price of new vinyl is around £20 its furkin shocking.

i have had to send pretty much 99% back to the sellers due to quality control. amazon is not too bad as its free return postage but other places cost you to send them back.

its making me want to return to CD........

Bob Dillon
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Re: modern quality

Post by Bob Dillon » 05 Jan 2020 00:32

Phony vinyl-mania has bitten the dust.

AsOriginallyRecorded
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Re: modern quality

Post by AsOriginallyRecorded » 05 Jan 2020 01:51

I don't as a general rule buy new vinyl unless it is by artists that I know won't tolerate inferior production of their art, and don't want their reputation tarnished by association with that same shoddy production and packaging. Much of the problem , in my opinion and experience, is due largely to a time warp difference in attitude. In vinyl's heyday, everyone evolved the media and competed fairly in the market to further their share, and at the same time, develop the format to it's full potential. Today, a majority of manufacturers and distributors are simply fighting it out to grab a share of the resurgence of vinyl profits. It is evident that the majority of these companies are not investing significantly in the industry, instead, squeezing as much out of the market as they can, however they can. Some times, you can truly say it was better in the old days. To be fair, there are still conscientious manufacturers, producers and distributors out there, but they are definitely in the minority. :x

vinyl master
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Re: modern quality

Post by vinyl master » 05 Jan 2020 03:47

I do think, too, that as more pressing plants get built, hopefully the quality will improve somewhat and at the very least, reduce the bottleneck on getting vinyl out there, so maybe more time and consideration can be taken with the final product, instead of rushing to put stuff out due to a backlog of requests...I'm sure that's only part of the problem, but an important factor nonetheless...

More thoughts here...

https://pitchfork.com/thepitch/363-why- ... ng-plants/
https://www.factmag.com/2015/05/07/pres ... dge-vinyl/
https://dcist.com/story/18/12/06/in-the ... -virginia/

philbrown
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Re: modern quality

Post by philbrown » 05 Jan 2020 04:59

Press cycling time and temperature control are far more important than disc weight.
Phil Brown

circularvibes
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Re: modern quality

Post by circularvibes » 05 Jan 2020 06:23

I don't buy too many new LPs but have only had to return a couple. One had a chemical burn on it and the shop just went EWW and promptly ordered another copy happily for me. The other was so badly marked that it was clearly a reseal by the manufacturer. When I returned it they took it out and were shocked how bad it was marked. The store wasn't well lit either. The replacement was significantly better but not perfect. Any new records I buy get immediately transferred to new poly inners. I have resorted to slicing (carefully) the paper or cardstock inner to remove the disc without further damage. For what an LP costs these days I wish they'd not cheap out on the inner sleeve. I mean in bulk they can't cost more than 2 or 3 cents more, right? 180-220 gram pressings don't impress me any more than a well pressed Dynaflex. As long as the disc is stamped on center and proper care for temp and timing is observed I will likely enjoy it. I was lucky with the 2 big Beatles boxes from what I've heard online, mine all played the way I expected them to for the price. What I don't like about today's pressings are some seem to have shallower grooves that make every surface scuff audible and the heavier discs tend to rip through the sleeves and jackets if enjoyed often enough.

Vinylfreak86
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Re: modern quality

Post by Vinylfreak86 » 05 Jan 2020 11:00

backtotheblack wrote:
05 Jan 2020 00:17

180g vinyl but put in card inners which shed dust all over the surface never mind all the surface storage marks along with when you try and get it out of the too tight card inners it scratches.
It happened too many times to me, majority of my new records are scratched only because of stupid plastic paper inner sleeves. :o
backtotheblack wrote:
05 Jan 2020 00:17
its making me want to return to CD........
In some cases I returned to a CD only because of inferior quality of new vinyl, more in terms of sound. I discovered japanese SHM-CD and for just some more eur than new vinyl it beats it in terms of sound quality for some stages. And you know what you will get, they don`t cheat.

rewfew
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Re: modern quality

Post by rewfew » 05 Jan 2020 15:10

It's been a mixed bag for me, new and old. I've had old with warps and off center labels. And new with what looked like paper fibers pressed in to the record. Probably they chopped up the defects, label and all. I will say for my reggae reissues, they have by and large been well produced and sound great.

Bob Dillon
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Re: modern quality

Post by Bob Dillon » 06 Jan 2020 01:28

rewfew wrote:
05 Jan 2020 15:10
It's been a mixed bag for me, new and old. I've had old with warps and off center labels. And new with what looked like paper fibers pressed in to the record. Probably they chopped up the defects, label and all. I will say for my reggae reissues, they have by and large been well produced and sound great.
May well be regrind, which is where they reprocess whole discs to be melted down again, label and all. Record plants were doing that dating back to at least the 1970's.

backtotheblack
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Re: modern quality

Post by backtotheblack » 06 Jan 2020 01:37

HFN test LP.. same story. i had to clean it before i could use it. then straight into a polly liner.

when we still had proper record shops you could ask to sift through the new stuff if you were a regular. i got thrown out a few for telling staff they were morons due to how they handled vinyl.

i have a small local shop here where i live but i dont want to use then coz i know i'll get thrown out.

yes i'm picky but vinyl costs money. i have about spat my coffee over my screen a few times looking at vinyl prices.

its funny how the hardware is getting better and better but the vinyl is not.

as a company i dont like Amazon but their return policy is superb, they do all the work for FREE. i'll get barred eventually... lol

backtotheblack
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Re: modern quality

Post by backtotheblack » 06 Jan 2020 01:39

Bob Dillon wrote:
06 Jan 2020 01:28
rewfew wrote:
05 Jan 2020 15:10
It's been a mixed bag for me, new and old. I've had old with warps and off center labels. And new with what looked like paper fibers pressed in to the record. Probably they chopped up the defects, label and all. I will say for my reggae reissues, they have by and large been well produced and sound great.
May well be regrind, which is where they reprocess whole discs to be melted down again, label and all. Record plants were doing that dating back to at least the 1970's.
thats coz of the oil crisis and lack of good virgin vinyl.

Vinylfreak86
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Re: modern quality

Post by Vinylfreak86 » 06 Jan 2020 09:55

Bob Dillon wrote:
06 Jan 2020 01:28

May well be regrind, which is where they reprocess whole discs to be melted down again, label and all. Record plants were doing that dating back to at least the 1970's.
New records are not made of recycled plastic, but would be better for the environment if they were. Because if remaster is bad, even the best virgin vinyl material won`t do anything to make it sound better. [-X

rewfew
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Re: modern quality

Post by rewfew » 07 Jan 2020 16:10

backtotheblack wrote:
06 Jan 2020 01:39
thats coz of the oil crisis and lack of good virgin vinyl.
The only oil crisis we have today is the environmental one created by it's over reliance and use. The example I referenced was a contemporary pressing. I think it was as a result of an all to universal occurrence from then to now. Greed and lapse of ethical values.

backtotheblack
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Re: modern quality

Post by backtotheblack » 13 Jan 2020 01:09

another 5 albums and another 5 to go back. this means a trip to HMV in Edinburgh who are closing in two weeks.

all albums have either surface marking resulting in swish swish or proper indents resulting in thump thump or scratches that you can tell were present on the stamper. i would not mind if these were second hand but for brand new its shocking. who is buying these albums, getting them home and playing them without fussing?

or am i just unlucky......

tim_bissell
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Re: modern quality

Post by tim_bissell » 13 Jan 2020 22:01

No, I'm sure there are lots of real plus points to living near Edinburgh! 8-)

On a more serious note, I've not had many duff new LPs (one scratched re-issue in maybe 20 new albums), but I don't have a large sample - hope I have not jinxed myself now.

-- Tim

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