Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

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vinyl master
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Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by vinyl master » 21 Feb 2019 21:15

Read this article to the very end...

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2019020 ... ate-change

If you read the last few paragraphs, there is something to be said for our love of vinyl...Maybe we've been right all along? :-k

hobie1dog
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by hobie1dog » 22 Feb 2019 01:54

I just like music, in any possible format mankind can come up with.

VinyldechezPierre
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by VinyldechezPierre » 22 Feb 2019 11:51

Interesting article that confirms what I had read a while back. About data storage centers, not music streaming in particular, but it applies.

The only thing I would change about your post is the title: Is streaming music really bad for us? seems a better one.

Humankind's arrogance is incredible. The planet will recover from us, we will not.

JaS
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by JaS » 22 Feb 2019 12:10

I only stream music across my local network *, but servers are designed to be left on so I installed a plug-in called 'Lights Out' that puts it into hibernation if there is no network traffic for 15 minutes, and my players 'ping' the server to wake it up again if I press play.

Little things like using solid state hard drives and getting them to power down after a few minutes helps too. As solid state drives fall in price air con systems in server farms won't have to work as hard which should cut the amount of electricity used.

* Damn, I just remembered I used an internet radio

dysmike
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by dysmike » 22 Feb 2019 17:03

There's a huge push to lower the energy utilization and carbon footprint of data centers. Everything from alternate cooling methods (evaporative cooling in dry climates), to running systems hotter (so that you can maintain a datacenter at 30ºc rather than 10-15ºc.

That's in addition to building machines that are less energy hungry (which, incidentally is also a side-effect of mobile computing and battery reliance). I doubt we'll see spinning drives very much longer, to be honest. The energy usage is just no longer acceptable. We're also seeing higher storage densities (the amount of storage in a physical footprint).

Then there's people like Apple, who are moving to 100% renewable energy sources for their DCs (that might have actually already occurred, I've not paid much attention to be honest).

JaS
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by JaS » 22 Feb 2019 17:16

dysmike wrote:
22 Feb 2019 17:03
That's in addition to building machines that are less energy hungry (which, incidentally is also a side-effect of mobile computing and battery reliance). I doubt we'll see spinning drives very much longer, to be honest. The energy usage is just no longer acceptable. We're also seeing higher storage densities (the amount of storage in a physical footprint).
I went for SSDs for the HFE and VE servers this time, but an HDD for backup. They really need to lower the prices of larger 2TB+ SSDs. I bought an 8TB USB3 HDD for my home server for £120 last year. The same shop wanted £900 for a bare 4TB SSD drive.

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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by dysmike » 23 Feb 2019 20:01

JaS wrote:
22 Feb 2019 17:16
I went for SSDs for the HFE and VE servers this time, but an HDD for backup. They really need to lower the prices of larger 2TB+ SSDs. I bought an 8TB USB3 HDD for my home server for £120 last year. The same shop wanted £900 for a bare 4TB SSD drive.
Was that an enterprise drive? 900 quid's a bit much for a consumer 4TB!

Alec124c41
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by Alec124c41 » 24 Feb 2019 00:15

In a hundred years, vinyl records will be all that is left of our music.

Cheers,
Alec

VinyldechezPierre
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by VinyldechezPierre » 24 Feb 2019 13:09

Alec124c41 wrote:
24 Feb 2019 00:15
In a hundred years, vinyl records will be all that is left of our music.
So long as the younger generations take over our collections and take care of them.

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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by JaS » 24 Feb 2019 21:15

dysmike wrote:
23 Feb 2019 20:01
JaS wrote:
22 Feb 2019 17:16
I went for SSDs for the HFE and VE servers this time, but an HDD for backup. They really need to lower the prices of larger 2TB+ SSDs. I bought an 8TB USB3 HDD for my home server for £120 last year. The same shop wanted £900 for a bare 4TB SSD drive.
Was that an enterprise drive? 900 quid's a bit much for a consumer 4TB!
I think it was a Samsung as I put a 1TB SSD in my laptop around the same time.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-inch-S ... B01ECEM7S2

vinyl master
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by vinyl master » 25 Feb 2019 04:26

VinyldechezPierre wrote:
24 Feb 2019 13:09
Alec124c41 wrote:
24 Feb 2019 00:15
In a hundred years, vinyl records will be all that is left of our music.
So long as the younger generations take over our collections and take care of them.
It would be nice...It makes me wonder how many younger people have discovered their parents' collections of old 60's and 70's records and were influenced by them...Notice that the music of The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, etc. still sells, so "timeless" hasn't gone out of style yet...Someone is buying those records! :-k

And after some research, I think I know who it is...Older people!

https://spinditty.com/industry/Who-is-B ... -You-Think

You know what I've noticed, though...It's mostly younger people buying their music at places like fye, Urban Oufitters, Barnes & Noble and places like my local 2nd & Charles bookstore, whereas the record stores, Discogs, audio expos and outdoor fairs have been mostly filled with older people (I've seen this firsthand from both sides)...What I think needs to happen is that more older people need to share their love of music with the younger generation...Take them to these places or get them excited about great music...I had parents, cousins and teachers who introduced me to a lot of great music over the years...My mom and dad would take us kids to all those garage sales, thrift shops and flea markets and I picked up a lot of records that way...I wonder if the kids nowadays have reference points for music discovery like that or are they just discovering new artists through YouTube algorithms, Spotify and whatever they hear on the radio, if they're even listening to the radio...

VinyldechezPierre
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by VinyldechezPierre » 25 Feb 2019 08:20

The article is not uninteresting but did not say much I didn't already know or thought I knew. But it has one problem as far as who listens to what: it only takes into account sales.

I think the results would be quite different if illegal downloads were taken into consideration. I would think younger people do the vast majority of those.

Now, although they don't do it in a way that appeals to me, I think younger people spend more time listening to music. Wherever I go, I see a whole lot more younger people with either headphones or earbuds on.

Other than that I don't quite recognize myself in the article but I'm kind of a life UFO. :) I rarely fit the image given by this type of article. For one, I buy a lot of newer music. :D

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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by andybeau » 25 Feb 2019 09:47

VinyldechezPierre wrote:
25 Feb 2019 08:20
I think the results would be quite different if illegal downloads were taken into consideration. I would think younger people do the vast majority of those.
I have to disagree with this statement. From the young people I know streaming is the thing, downloads are as old hat as CDs. The people I know who download illegally are usually in their 40s.

Why buy when you can listen to what you want on Spotify, YouTube, etc. This is the majorities thought process nowadays. IMO :)

Remember people into Hifi are in the minority and always have been.

VinyldechezPierre
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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by VinyldechezPierre » 25 Feb 2019 10:39

andybeau wrote:
25 Feb 2019 09:47
Remember people into Hifi are in the minority and always have been.
They can't always have been. There was a before digital when the choices were the radio and a Hifi, and there was a slight problem with the radio: no choice of what one listened to.

But I agree with what you said before. Streaming is so not me, it didn't even come to mind. :(

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Re: Is streaming music really bad for the planet?

Post by dysmike » 25 Feb 2019 13:12

I remember lofi systems, back in the day before digital. I remember cheap all in ones. It wasn't all hifi as I recall, not by a long stretch. This is one of the reasons that records often missed a lot of bass.

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