Repairing a Garrard turntable

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michaelr1
Posts: 2
Joined: 07 Jun 2016 01:11

Repairing a Garrard turntable

Post by michaelr1 » 07 Jun 2016 01:58

Hi all. I am new to this forum, as you will soon see. I am trying to find some answers to refurbishing a Garrard turntable located inside an old hi-fi console. At this moment, I do not have the model number handy, but it seems to be nearly (if not exactly) like the 2025, as in the attached photo. The cartridge is an Astatic 137D, or so it says. Long story short, the double revolving-type needle fell out, so I removed the entire cartridge to put it back in. One of the cartridge cables lost its lead while trying to put it back. I need to fix or replace that, but would like to see about replacing the needle, and if necessary the cartridge as well. Does anybody have a familiarity with this unit, and would they be so kind as to give me some tips on how to replace the cable and what sort of cartridge/needle assembly would work on this turntable? Any help would be much appreciated, thanks!
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musicmn
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United States of America
Posts: 2451
Joined: 02 Jan 2012 22:05
Location: Milwaukee Wisconsin

Re: Repairing a Garrard turntable

Post by musicmn » 07 Jun 2016 16:53

Hi, besides just replacing the tonearm wire and stylus you will most likely need to strip out the mechanism and remove all the old grease. Then apply fresh grease to the parts as you assemble it. Garrard's are well known on this forum for having old grease issues. The grease that was used at the factory will get hard and turn to concrete and cause all kinds of issues with the automatic functions of any turntable. The cartridge you have is a ceramic type commonly used on these consoles. You can only use a ceramic type with this console do to the fact that these units did not have built in phono pre amps. Ceramic cartridges put out enough millivolts so a pre amp was not needed. This was a cost savings for the manufactures of consoles. Also because of the design of the headshell only a slim cartridge will fit so your better off just replacing the stylus. Just google the model number of the cartridge and a bunch of sellers will come up. You will need to remove the turntable from the console to service it. Just remove the back of the console and you will notice some clips on the underside on the deck. These clips are attached to the two large screws you can see on top of the deck. Just flip the clips up then unplug all wires and lift the turntable out. Once out you can then see how to replace the wire. If there is enough wire you just might be able to solder the end back on. Otherwise you will need to order new tonearm wires to replace yours. If you have anymore questions check out the Garrard forum on this site. Questions like yours pop up on there all the time and you might just find some answers there. Good luck and I hope this helps.

michaelr1
Posts: 2
Joined: 07 Jun 2016 01:11

Re: Repairing a Garrard turntable

Post by michaelr1 » 08 Jun 2016 03:07

Great, thanks! I have already watched a Youtube tutorial on freeing up the mechanical parts. This console hi-fi came with my nephew's recently purchased cottage. He is quite proud of his old school music box, so maybe I will take the time to get it running just right...

pmetro
United States of America
Posts: 4
Joined: 29 Sep 2019 04:39

Re: Repairing a Garrard turntable

Post by pmetro » 07 Oct 2019 02:20

some photos from repair log Garrard Model 82 to share, an example as to what you can expect to find on these turntables if you are interested in renewal of these gems. :!: a few tips found out along the way.
PROBLEM : Speed/size control stuck, jammed, or hard to move.
SOLUTION: disassemble, clean, reassemble, lubricate (like we know already!)

Gunky Grease

remove clips
, best to document with photos for reassembly, either with a phone or good use for a discarded digital camera. Serious re builders use a overhead camera at the bench to collect video of the repair. Download load the service manual for reference (here at the vinyl engine) if available but even the best drawings cannot show the actual movement or assembled arrangement. You tube can be a resource also if someone has posted a clear video. Take precaution of removing, assembling spring clips that tend to take flight off the bench never to be found again ! unless you have spares (in the real world that counts against stock as a short !) [-X

remove screw fastener, attaches dial selector wheel to mechanism

what your probably already accustomed to ! #-o

the offending mechanism removed from the stud, plenty of penetrating oil to free it up , the stud only designed to support the levers that are supposed to rotate effortlessly ! Avoid excessive force to get part free or rotate, that aged lubrication is like glue. Use penetrating oil overnight, tap assembly very gently from time to time , vibrations can help with freeing up the parts. Ideally you want to disassemble parts by hand only. Used a small screwdriver under the lever for removal and touched up the paint at the base of the stud, to prevent rust in the future and just being a ______________ should anyone see under there ! :oops:

clean, de-grease, parts, the bushing on the lever could come loose from the lever by the stuck grease and rotate not as designed, the roller on the end should rotate freely that rides on the detents of the selector by spring pressure.

Reassembled, tested before greasing, watch out for non idiot proof parts and springs that can be assembled 180 degrees out or upside down etc. :toilet: on this the dial indicator alignment. Another reason for dis assembly documentation through photos


Problem : erratic tone arm set down position, not according to setting 12 inch 7 inch settings :cry:
Solution: again, stuck lever by grease, disassemble, clean reassemble , lubricate #-o
Don't have many pictures here but lever that connects to the size selector of the speed/size knob by linkage gunked up and sticking.
(Don't have the diagram part numbers with me now.) That lever should move with minimal pressure, not by a ton of force needed to overcome the grease.

Here is a better view, with penetrating oil, plastic cap, c clip and screw fastener removed, lever is similar in design to the above speed selector arrangement. Cleaning was enough with the penetrating oil to return it to proper operation, \:D/ not necessary to remove this lever as it's nested between others. Lever size selector linkage (foreground) now bears against the detent properly to set the tone arm to the correct record size position selected. The lever position is checked into place during a cycle by the spring loaded lever on the other arm (in the background) so if it is at all hindered to sliding the tone arm placement is erratic
It takes time to observe the operation of this before it's apparent that somethings just sticking, ](*,) revolving the main cam gear by hand many times and setting the speed size control if your not familiar with the Garrard mechanism, chalk it up to a learning curve if your doing this as a repair business or on a clock. :smoking: Troubleshooting can be completed by also attempting to independently move if possible the parts/levers gently by hand to isolate the sticking parts as are many are interconnected during the cycles of operation.

If your fickle about repairs, having modern conveniences like a smart device connected cloud storage of photos/video etc can help immensely to document your repairs..
:D GOOD LUCK IN YOUR REPAIR RESTORATION EFFORTS :!:
BE SURE TO ADD COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS IF INCLINED

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