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Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

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Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby dsavage0109 » 17 Feb 2017 16:42

Knucklehead alert....

I was refitting my shure cartridge to my dual 1019 headshell and in the process added a heavy shim.

When I attached it back to the tonearm, I totally forgot to rebalance the tone arm and ended up putting a lot of pressure on the stylus. I only realized it because I could see the sytlus cutting into the vinyl. I stopped it as soon as I saw that happening.

Anyway, I put everything back the way it was. Records seem to be playing right.

Just worried I may have damaged the stylus. Should I be concerned?
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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby spunkerboybr » 17 Feb 2017 17:15

The stylus was probably not damaged. It the cantilever looks fine, I highly doubt the diamond will have some sort of damage, especially considering you've probably used the excessive tracking force for a short period of time (it was short, wasn't it?).

As for the records you've played with the higher tracking force, I would play the affected areas again to check for wear that was not there before. The one thing that really scared me on your topic is the sentence 'I could see the sytlus cutting into the vinyl'. Were you able to see some leftover vinyl dust on the record surface?

Just for the record: given you are using the original MicroRidge stylus (the same applies to the SAS/neoSAS styli manufactured by JICO), its contact area is significantly higher than regular conical and elliptical styli; hence, even with higher tracking forces (within an 'unexaggerated' interval, of course), one would probably put up an amount of pressure on the groove walls that is not alarming and comparable to the regular/nominal pressure of conicals and ellipticals.
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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby maggie93 » 17 Feb 2017 17:47

dsavage0109 wrote:Knucklehead alert....

I was refitting my shure cartridge to my dual 1019 headshell and in the process added a heavy shim.

When I attached it back to the tonearm, I totally forgot to rebalance the tone arm and ended up putting a lot of pressure on the stylus. I only realized it because I could see the sytlus cutting into the vinyl. I stopped it as soon as I saw that happening.

Anyway, I put everything back the way it was. Records seem to be playing right.

Just worried I may have damaged the stylus. Should I be concerned?


Shure, along with many cartridges, were designed with a "V" notch that allows the stylus/cantilever to retract into the notch if excessive pressure is placed on the tonearm.
That is where the "V" came from in the model number.
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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby ray_parkhurst » 17 Feb 2017 18:25

maggie93 wrote:That is where the "V" came from in the model number.


I would have thought "V15" was short for "VTA 15 degrees"
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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby Kurt45 » 17 Feb 2017 18:39

Shure introduced the retracting stylus, dubbed the Gard-a-Matic, in 1962. The first V15 came out in 1964.
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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby maggie93 » 17 Feb 2017 19:03

ray_parkhurst wrote:
maggie93 wrote:That is where the "V" came from in the model number.


I would have thought "V15" was short for "VTA 15 degrees"


Back in the "old" days, it was the standard, 15 degrees, but now, obsessed audioholics relate everything to VTA, VTF, etc.
Kurt45's comment regarding the Gard-O-Matic was the original definition, which evolved into the "V-Guard" design.
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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby Kurt45 » 17 Feb 2017 19:35

maggie93 wrote:Shure, along with many cartridges, were designed with a "V" notch that allows the stylus/cantilever to retract into the notch if excessive pressure is placed on the tonearm.


I know the V15V has "SIDE-GUARD stylus protection" (Shure: "This unique feature responds to side thrusts on the stylus by momentarily forcing the stylus shank and stylus tip upward so that the shank does not bend sideways"), but does it retract due to excess VTF also? If so, then the OP's stylus is certainly fine; if the VTF wasn't enough to retract the stylus, then it wasn't enough to do any damage.
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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby maggie93 » 17 Feb 2017 19:50

Kurt45 wrote:
maggie93 wrote:Shure, along with many cartridges, were designed with a "V" notch that allows the stylus/cantilever to retract into the notch if excessive pressure is placed on the tonearm.


I know the V15V has "SIDE-GUARD stylus protection" (Shure: "This unique feature responds to side thrusts on the stylus by momentarily forcing the stylus shank and stylus tip upward so that the shank does not bend sideways"), but does it retract due to excess VTF also? If so, then the OP's stylus is certainly fine; if the VTF wasn't enough to retract the stylus, then it wasn't enough to do any damage.


Depending on the manufacturer, "V Guard" or "Side Guard" is the phrase used, I wouldn't nitpick over it, they all were designed to protect the stylus from being mashed by providing a little "space" for the stylus to retract into.
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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby Kurt45 » 17 Feb 2017 20:16

Just to clarify, I didn't put "Side Guard" in all caps; it came that way from Shure's literature, which I cut & pasted. I wasn't trying to make a "V Guard" versus "Side Guard" distinction; I was just asking whether the V15V stylus retracts due to excess tracking force. Shure doesn't specifically mention it:

The protection system helps to limit stylus damage if: 1) the cartridge accidentally slides across a record, 2) the cartridge is dropped onto the record, or 3) the stylus is bumped into the edge of the record. This unique feature responds to side thrusts on the stylus by momentarily forcing the stylus shank and stylus tip upward so that the shank does not bend sideways.

If it does retract due to excess VTF, then dsavage0109's stylus is probably fine, since it never retracted.
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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby Alec124c41 » 17 Feb 2017 21:06

With a Shure, the plastic body of the cartridge would hit the record before you did any damage with excessive VTF. They were well designed.

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Re: Too Much Tracking Force - Shure V15VXMR

Postby dsavage0109 » 28 Feb 2017 00:35

So it looks like I may have dodged a bullet. It was a very short period of time - maybe 30 seconds, just long enough to hear it wasn't playing right. And I noticed it shaved off some vinyl from the record. That part of the record is damaged and sounds like it.
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