Connoisseur motor replacement

snap, crackle and pop
Post Reply
Michael626
member
member
Posts: 80
Joined: 29 May 2018 14:57

Connoisseur motor replacement

Post by Michael626 » 20 Jun 2019 17:28

Hi, the motor on my BD2A stopped spinning. I took it apart, cleaned it, re-lubed it and still nothing. I used an ohm meter and tested the wires and got nothing, so that indicates a broken wire in the motor housing itself? I was lucky enough to find a motor off of ebay and the machine is working fine now. But, can this motor be repaired? I know a shop that has repaired several of my wood shop motors but he says he won't work on something this small. Has anyone found a replacement motor that will work with my BD2A? I hate to just drop it in the parts box, plus if the one I am using now goes out, it would be nice to have a repaired one to install.
Thanks
Michael

nat
long player
long player
Posts: 4456
Joined: 07 Nov 2002 19:05

Re: Connoisseur motor replacement

Post by nat » 20 Jun 2019 22:39

Even though Sugden, Connoisseur's founder and designer, was a garden shed mechanic of prodigious inventiveness and skill and did a lot of stuff in house to keep costs down, I have a hard time believing he would get involved in a whole extra production line to make something as standard as an electric motor. So they must be out there somewhere.

'Garden shed mechanic' is a cliche, not a technical description, though the article about Sugden in Audio Amateur(?) did use the phrase, and the picture of him in his workshop looked rather like it might be an accurate phrase. I'm sure the company had a well equipped lab and machine shop, but clearly the genesis of their products was the mind of a tinkerer.

Michael626
member
member
Posts: 80
Joined: 29 May 2018 14:57

Re: Connoisseur motor replacement

Post by Michael626 » 21 Jun 2019 13:21

I agree that these little motors were more likely something common back then, then being 50 years ago, but they might have been so cheap and common they were considered expendables and just thrown away when they died. Interesting that they were made for 110 volts and those used in Europe had a step down resistor so they could be used with 220 volts. I'll keep looking.
Michael

Post Reply