Belts materials

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savakntr
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Belts materials

Post by savakntr » 17 Feb 2019 17:08

Hi guys,

I wonder, whether anyone has gone deeper in alternative materials for turntable belts.
I read recently a paper for o rings and new different materials are not in production which are more suitable for dynamic applications. These materials have abrasive resistant qualities and they are bagging resistant.

Has anyone tried such materials?

nat
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Re: Belts materials

Post by nat » 17 Feb 2019 22:25

From the point of view of manufacturers, you are suggesting a solution where there is no problem. Some belts turn to goo after a decade or so, but I don't think I've seen O rings do that, but either way, the warrantee period is long past, and from the manufacturer's perspective, that just means they might buy a new table.
There might be a market for long life belts as replacements, but that would be a small segment of what is a small market anyway, so I doubt if there is much incentive for research and experimentation.
You might be on to something, though, if you can find out more.

Solist
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Re: Belts materials

Post by Solist » 18 Feb 2019 11:00

You will find that most tts use rubber (O rings or belts), although some manufacturers use a thin string. Kuzma uses plastic belts for his turntables, the theory being it does not loose as much torque when rotating the platter as rubber does.

As nat already mentioned, if you turntable uses a traditional belt, get a replacement identical to the original. Using a different belt will likely cause speed problems, and since most of the belt drives dont have a pitch control, it can get annoying.

hobie1dog
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Re: Belts materials

Post by hobie1dog » 18 Feb 2019 23:17

The strongest natural fiber is hemp, someone will start making belts out of hemp soon.

Jim Leach
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Re: Belts materials

Post by Jim Leach » 19 Feb 2019 01:05

Funny you mention it...

I just put together a “test kit” where you can try several materials and pick the one you like best.

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=109867

nat
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Re: Belts materials

Post by nat » 19 Feb 2019 22:50

I thought spider web was the strongest natural fiber. Kind of hard to herd them, though.

AudioFeline
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Re: Belts materials

Post by AudioFeline » 20 Feb 2019 00:58

hobie1dog wrote:
18 Feb 2019 23:17
The strongest natural fiber is hemp, someone will start making belts out of hemp soon.
I have read reports of people buying used records and finding hemp in the sleeve. Perhaps the previous owners were trying to roll a hemp belt to play the record. :D

Ear today
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Re: Belts materials

Post by Ear today » 21 Feb 2019 11:09

A closely related question.
What happens to the belt if it spends a few months without moving? Part of it is following a tight curve around the motor spindle pulley, part is on a wide arc around the platter, and two parts are suspended in the straight line. Does spending an extended time like this cause hard spots or irregular stretch areas?
Food for thought.

Solist
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Re: Belts materials

Post by Solist » 21 Feb 2019 12:08

Ear today wrote:
21 Feb 2019 11:09
A closely related question.
What happens to the belt if it spends a few months without moving? Part of it is following a tight curve around the motor spindle pulley, part is on a wide arc around the platter, and two parts are suspended in the straight line. Does spending an extended time like this cause hard spots or irregular stretch areas?
Food for thought.
It should not be a problem, but you never know what quality of belt your turntable has. Let it spin, it might fix the issue.

Jim Leach
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Re: Belts materials

Post by Jim Leach » 21 Feb 2019 14:37

Well, on the Rega (black belt) is keeps that form where it goes around the motor spindle. Probably a good idea to warm it up a while before playing a disc.

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