Need 15' long RCA cable between turntable and receiver

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62vauxhall
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Re: Need 15' long RCA cable between turntable and receiver

Post by 62vauxhall » 19 Oct 2019 16:57

Agree with previous poster jackie.

By necessity, I have a 6' length of RCA cable from pre-amp phono inputs extending to a box with RCA jacks and the box is mounted to the front of an equipment stand. The reason being it's a convenient connection point for whichever turntable I feel like using. I routinely replace turntable leads with new ones, usually themselves 6' in length.

So the total run is more like 12' - I've yet to experience any hum.

Should there be any other degradation I don't notice it therefore it does not exist.

stanwebber
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Re: Need 15' long RCA cable between turntable and receiver

Post by stanwebber » 25 Oct 2019 07:33

so I'm in the same situation with a 12' run between my turntable platform and stereo receiver. currently I'm setup, as others have suggested, with selectable preamps at the turntable platform feeding the aux input on my stereo receiver. i prefer this arrangement as I can switch out between 6 different preamps to suit my tastes, but back in the day when my stereo receiver was my sole preamp i ran the turntable wiring the entire 12' length. I'm going to break with conventional wisdom and tell you that it can be done without any noticable audio artifacts. in order to attempt this you're going to have to find cables with massive shielding which isn't easy. cable price or thickness or rigidity is not a reliable indicator. i tried more than a dozen ostensibly higher quality cables (some bought; some borrowed) and none completely satisfied my ears until I ran across quite a humble radio shack cable some 30 or so years old from a box-o-wires. in terms of cable thickness it didn't even fall within the upper 50% of all the cables i tried, but it was able to absolutely block out all interference. in comparison, I could pull in local radio stations loud and clear (no exageration) with the poorest performing cables. some cables came really close and performed quite well, but I could still detect a different flavor to the sound. i found the radio shack cable to be indistinguishable when switching back and forth between direct connection and long run. my advice is to audition any cables you might already have lying around. you might get lucky like I did and be pleasantly surprised.

JoeE SP9
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Re: Need 15' long RCA cable between turntable and receiver

Post by JoeE SP9 » 26 Oct 2019 21:46

Seems like an awful lot of work to listen to some vinyl. :-s

ChrisfromRI
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Re: Need 15' long RCA cable between turntable and receiver

Post by ChrisfromRI » 31 Oct 2019 00:45

The 15 foot long turntable cable brings in the issue of the capacitive loading from the long cable affecting the tonal response of the cartridge. That's probably why the cables all sounded so different, and by accident you might just arrive at a very acceptable sounding combination.

For example, there is capacitance between the center conductor and the outer conductor's excellent shielding with coaxial cable. A pretty thick low capacitance coaxial cable would be common RG-6 foam dielectric cable TV type cable, and it has capacitance of around 19 pF per foot. 15 feet totals up to 285 pF. Some cartridges sound good with this level of capacitive loading. A pair of these cable could be used for connecting the turntable to the phono stage and might be fine. OTOH, RG-58 coax is a little thinner and has capacitance of around 28 pF per foot which in this case totals up to 420 pF capacitive loading. Both provide excellent shielding but very different capacitive loading so will likely sound different - depending upon the cartridge and what sort of capacitive loading works for that cartridge. Putting a phono stage closer to the turntable reduces this reliance on the particular cables being used, and in fact some phono stages give you a capacitive loading switch to pick the optimal sounding combination by simply adjusting the switch.