help with Technics Sl-B350

turning japanese
Alec124c41
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Post by Alec124c41 » 25 Nov 2010 19:52

Bug - an insect that was electrocuted across 2 conductors in an electrical circuit. The charred carcass was conductive enough to disrupt early tube/valve - based computing machines, and necessitated periodic cleaning, or de-bugging.

Cheers,
Alec

wordwizard
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Post by wordwizard » 26 Nov 2010 03:21

Alec124c41 wrote:Bug - an insect that was electrocuted across 2 conductors in an electrical circuit. The charred carcass was conductive enough to disrupt early tube/valve - based computing machines, and necessitated periodic cleaning, or de-bugging.

Cheers,
Alec

Got it in one!

There are references to earlier "bug" problems, circa early 20s, though.
Insects sometimes migrated across relay contacts and were smashed; the moisture and the chitin created enough of a resistive path so contacts started to burn and pit.

Same end result; stuff not working. ;)

Speaking of critters' paths crossing electrical circuits, I had an interesting one.
Years ago, while in college I worked at one of the HeathKit Electronic Centers. A customer brought in an older tube amplifier that his father had built years earlier. He said that one day it blew the fuse so they put it away. Now he wanted it repaired.

I put in the bench and removed it from the wooden base it had been bolted to and discovered the skeleton of a small field mouse that had apparently crawled in via a vent hole in the base and had its little teeth firmly clamped around one of the B+ leads....

Whitneyville
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Post by Whitneyville » 26 Nov 2010 07:38

You're darn close on the key ignition car! It was a Packard but '37-'38 models (depending on how fancy a model you bought). The Model "T" and "A" had a key lock that was supposed to shut-off the electrical system, but didn't often, so you removed a battery cable to keep from running down the battery, but "T"s with electric starters (1921-25 extra cost option) and all Model "A"s had a foot starter pedal.
I knew about the "bug" thing from an oooold book on "Hertzian-Wave Recievers and Emitters"( transmitters..a term deForrest NEVER adopted in his life)by Lee deForrest (inventor of the amplifying vacuum tube, the "triode") we had in Central High School's library. It was still a three year high school then, and had been in Downtown Tulsa in the same building since 1917. The library was a treasure trove of OLD books. Sadly when they moved to the new building (out of Downtown, and the local electric company bought it for 1/20th of what the "dirt" was worth, and they totally remodeled it) all the good books disappeared. Kipling, Mark Twain, "Lives of the Noble Roman's"-Plutarc, 20 Volumes, and lot's more I had read, just "went away" like the five 9 foot Steinway grands, ALL pre-WWII models (considered to be MUCH better than later ones...they should be, the bronze, not painted steel frame weighed nearly a ton!). Just think political "connections" on the piano's, books and art that had been there 86 years I think. :shock:
BTW: On the education TV channel they were telling the story of the "original" micro-wave ovens. How Raytheon built one that cost $5000 in the 1950's and how everyone said "who'll pay $5000 for a hot-dog warmer?" WRONG!! Almost all WWII U.S. Navy submarines had TWO in the galley, because submerged,you are running on batteries only. They had electric ranges and electric ovens, but the microwave ovens cooked so much faster, and heated coffee, soup and left-overs from the previous watches' meal, many commanders forbade the use of anything but the microwave ovens submerged. The USS Batfish, which sank more Japanese submarines than any other US Sub in down near Muskogee,OK as a Memorial and you can tour it, and see what a late WWII "Balboa"-class fleet sub looked like, with four Fairbanks-Morse oppossed piston engines, the best engines ever used in US Subs. One cylinder with a crankshaft top and bottom, and they came together at the same time for combustion.
Oh, my Alfa-Romeo Spyder had a Magneto-Marrelli dual point distributor, so I've played with them. Two seperate coils for a in-line four that made peak power at 14,000 RPM, and had mechanical direct fuel injection(like a diesel). 1800 cc's made 168 DIN net HP@14,000 which is about 175 SAE HP. Rev it to "yellow line" before you shift. In the terms of the quant English owner's manual,"Whilst no harm will come to the engine by exceeding 14,000 RPM, no greater power is produced and only reduces economy and breaks the lubrication down faster." Every Saturday, saddle soap the leather seats, then put Neatsfoot Oil on them to waterproof them, then adjust the points and the timing, and check the cable to the fuel injector pump is tight, and put "Top-Dressing" on the rag-top, and treat the rear window so it wouldn't yellow and crack. Used aircraft 100% glycol for coolent. Normal tempature, 250-290*F. Winter is fun in a roadster too. Lower the top, roll-up the side windows, and turn the heater up. More comfortable than summer with the top up and the A/C on.
The Packard Twin-Six (which is what it was, 2 inline sixes with seperate crankshafts turning a layshaft to the transmission) has a distributor on one bank of cylinders at the front, the other at the rear. There is a 1941 dark blue 4 door sedan, all original, that an attorney drives to work everyday. It was his grandfathers'. He's been on TV with it at least a dozen times I can remember.
Also, a man who worked for the oil company I did, has a 1962 Dodge turbine car!! You couldn't "buy" them, you leased them from Chrysler and at some point, they'd ask you to return it. Well at least 12 of them in the US, never got the "return" letters, so he still has it, and I've ridden in it. It's rated at 200HP, which compared to the big engined cars (425 HP 7 liter Hemi available) doesn't sound impressive at all. They were all automatic transmission cars, and when you press the accelerator, it just pushes you back in your seat, and keeps you there, with a very subdued whistle/whine sound. At 65MPH, the turbine is spinning 30,000 RPM. And if will pour and you can light it with a match, it will run on it. Kerosene was 5 cents a gallon when they came out, and was the preferred fuel, and they'd push around the two-ton sedans at 19-25 MPG. Now that kerosene is very high priced, he uses 50% gasoline and 50% diesel. The turbine has never been serviced...hasn't needed it, except for oil changes every 10,000 hours, and it looks nearly showroom new. He re-tired in a little town up old Route 66 from Tulsa called Allwea (All-WAY). 45 minutes from my house. Ain't worthless trivia fun?
The first car I owned was a 1958 Chrysler Imperial 4 door "hardtop" (no center post) with the false "Continetal kit" on the top of the trunk. I swear the front bumper/bumper guards off it are two Kias now. It had a great Motarola 7 transistor 4 tube AM/FM radio. First 12 volt Chrysler since the 30's Airflow's. Summer's here are usually humid. The A/C in that land-yacht would actually make snow on HI-cool. I put 7 teenager's and me in it all the time, and drove all the county gravel roads. I didn't know you weren't suppose to not drive with the rear-end kicked out to one side at 65 MPH, and "drift" around curves. Big BF Goodrich "Silvertown 880" tires, biggest on any US car made then, bias ply of course and drum brakes, and power everything including air powered side windows. When it was cold,if I didn't drive for a day or two, the windows would "creep down" and I'd have to go start it to get 'em back up. Seals were going on the cylinders. AND, I had a HI-Way HI-FI 45 RPM record changer in it! Didn't work worth a darn, but it sat on the transmission "hump" and looked cool. But it was the ugliest color ever put on a car....baby-potty yellow...they had a fancy name for it, but that's what the paint looked like. :lol:

Remember Crosley refrigerators with the cold water dispensers in the door? Old GE refrigerators with the "drum" on top? Philco radios with 97 knobs and push buttons and only three worked, in 4 foot tall wood cabinets? Autolite spark plugs? Amrstong tires that "GRIP" the road? Fisk "It's Time to Re-Tire"? Avon "Tyres" for luxury cars? LSMFT? Herbert Taryton cigarettes? Sir Walter Raliegh smokes? Roi-Tan Cigars? White Owls? Grapette? Royal Crown? Kools? 3V Cola? Milk delivered in half-gallon glass bottles? P&G soap? Shaving mugs and brushes? Super Blue-Blades? Schick injector razors? Wildwood Creame Oil? Ipana? Luster Creame? Prell? Pepsodent powder? Lifebouy? Mrs. Wright's Bluing?FAB? Marvel Mystery Oil? Alemite CD-2? Ansco Film? BIF? Water coolers? Brownie's? InstaMatics? Laddie pencils? Scheffer pens? METAL Igloos? Bakelite telephones? 5 digit phone numbers? Party lines? No-Nox? Sky-Chief? Fire-Chief? Super Boron? U.S. Royals? Admiral TV's? Crosley System TV's? Armstrong FM stereo? Portable radios with "A" and "B" batteries? Tube testers at supermarkets? Tung-Sol tubes? Cobra-Matics?LUX? Green Mint? We'll keep this going 'til Christmas...

wordwizard
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Post by wordwizard » 26 Nov 2010 16:56

WOW, that was a great trip down memory lane! Next time I go by OK I need to look you up, sit on the porch and compare reminiscences.

Growing up in OK you had a lot more open area to roam around, unfortunately my teenage years were spent in suburban L.A. so our choices were a bit limited, albeit not as much as they are today.

Those Chrysler "land yachts" we something to behold alright. At one point I almost got my hands on a '59 Imperial, missed buying it by a couple of hours. My favorite car of all time has been the '60-'62 Continentals, specially the convertible with the suicide doors. Every once in a while we see one around here.

I had a MG for a while, twin SU carbs with the "oil here" dashpots. That was a fiasco; Lucas (the prince of darkness) electrics. Spent 4 hours wrenching on it for every hour driving it.

You left out the "Burma Shave" poems ;)

Whitneyville
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Post by Whitneyville » 27 Nov 2010 05:37

YES! British bikes had "Geo. Lucas Pty." electrics on them too, and my BSA Gold-Star Production racer (440cc single) had them too. It rains alot in England I understand, so where did BSA (Barely Starts Anymore) put the ignition coil? On the front down-tube of the frame where every drop of mositure from the front "tyre" HAD to hit it. I had an MG with a Smiths-Union carb, and a Triumph with another brand of carb. Both vapor locked all the time. The cure? A Weber two-barrel downdraft and new intake manifold. The BSA Gold-Star used 50W Castrol. On a 40* morning, do you know what that's like to kick-start? Like stomping the pavement on a 14mm rod as hard as you can! The thing would loosen your fillings at highway speed (worthless "suspension" and engine vibration). A hundred mile trip was an adventure. You never knew how far you might have to push it...
If you get out this way, give me a shout. We can swap war-stories of our past vehicles and such! :D

wordwizard
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Post by wordwizard » 27 Nov 2010 06:33

That was a common mod for the MGs, the downdraft Webers. One of my friends got so fed up with 'the prince of darkness' that he completely rewired his MG with Detroit parts... never had a bit of trouble since -at least in the electrics... the fluid leaks were another thing altogether. I only kept that MG for one year though.

Never had the 'fortune" of having a brit bike. I rode my Soft tail in the rain many times and it never missed a beat...

Most likely will pass through OK sometime next summer, will keep you posted. I hear that there are some great BBQ places down in your neck of the woods.

Whitneyville
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Post by Whitneyville » 28 Nov 2010 05:22

If you're driving, then before you hit OKCity, let me know to meet you for a "Meers Burger" in the wide spot in the road west and south of OKC. They have to be expirenced. :wink: From 14 years and one day 'til I got my car license at 16, I rode a Honda 160 Hawk (little twin, and still going with 30-thousand miles on it, according to the guy I sold it to). If it was a nice fall day (like today), if you had a Brit-Bike you could call-in and tell your boss "Futzer won't start." and he might buy it. With a Honda he'd say "Turn on the petcock and get your rear in here!" 8)
Didn't keep my MG a year, electrics were too unreilable. Didn't keep the "Bug-eyed" Sprite long either. I raced Fiat X1/9's for over a year, had a Datsun "Fairlady" 240 I highly modified (three small downdraft Weber's on a custom intake, headers (3-into-1's) a 5 speed "homemarket" tranny) and raced it. Stupid mistake, I just HAD to race in the 3 Liter class so I swapped it for a Porche 912, too much HP for the "old-style", like the 356 Speedster's suspension. Went to Fiat 1800 Spyders then to an Alfa spyder. Then I bought a Lancia sedan which was a sweetheart, and finally got a Masseratti Quatteraporta Saloon (longer than a sedan, shorter than a limo). Had fun "killing" Challegers with 340's with my "little" 4943cc four-valve-per cylinder V-8 (a big "5" for 5 liter on the trunk). Mechanic moved to Denver (a young woman) and I sold it the next week. KC or DFW too darn far for service.

wordwizard
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Post by wordwizard » 28 Nov 2010 17:59

Whitneyville wrote:If you're driving, then before you hit OKCity, let me know to meet you for a "Meers Burger" in the wide spot in the road west and south of OKC..
Done deal!

fast and nimble sports cars can be fun but the maintenance will bankrupt you. :)

I put my "disposable" income into airplanes and sailboats, until it got to where I couldn't support aluminum and fiberglass at the same time so fiberglass won.

Had a 34' sloop for about 15 years, the ultimate "beach house". Sold it when the cost of the slip got from "wow" to "you got to be kidding".... Now about 40% of the slips in that marina remain empty. -their loss ;)

sdbock
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Re: help with Technics Sl-B350

Post by sdbock » 27 May 2019 00:25

Hey, I have a Technics SL-B350 also, kinda reviving it after being in mothballs for over 10 yrs, need to find a power cord and a drive belt for the unit, does anyone have either?..price? LMK

Thanks
Steven Bock