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Garrard LAB 80

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Garrard LAB 80

Postby LAB80daave » 10 Feb 2005 20:51

HI-
I've got a LAB-80 that's driving me crazy.Problem-neither the "Auto" nor the "Manual" lever will stay in the"on" position in order to turn the turntable motor on. Motor runs OK if lever is held on. The mechanical arm ,located under the platter that the "Auto" and "Manual" levers are connected to, will stay "on" if pushed a final 1/4 inch or so to make contact. I've checked all the springs-none are missing-and all the mechanical arms seem to be straight. I have the SAMS photofact on the LAB-80 but truthfully it doesn't help much-pretty skimpy on info. Has anyone else ever experienced this problem with the LAB-80?? I know it wasn't the greatest Garrard turntable-but you gotta love that wooden tone arm!!
Thanks for any help-Cheers-Dave
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Postby jbautist2 » 11 Feb 2005 10:37

I highly recommend that you ask help from Joel D. Thorner, the owner of The Turntable Factory in Columbia, South Carolina. He's been into these machines since 1968 and I'm SURE that he can help you with your problem in your Garrard Lab-80.

His e-mail address: theturntablefactory@earthlink.net

Jonathan B.
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Postby LAB80daave » 13 Feb 2005 06:20

Thanks for your reply, Jonathan. I wrote an email to Joel at the Turntable Factory and got a prompt reply. Problem is-it wasn't much help. More like- send it there for repair. Economically it just doesn't make a lot of sense to spend major $$ on having it fixed. Besides fixing it myself has become sort of a quest. I have cleaned all of the grease from the various arms and levers that should actuate the power switch-but it still doesn't work. As far as I can tell, on the LAB 80, it is strictly a mechanical operation, with a tab on the power locking lever dropping into a slot on another arm whenever either the "manual" or the "auto" function switches are moved to "on". Problem is the tab is just about 1/32" short of dropping into the slot! All springs are in place and none of the levers are bent. Strange!!
Anyway thanks for your suggestion-Cheers-Dave
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Postby jbautist2 » 14 Feb 2005 11:14

I'd tell you the truth.... it's NOT worth buying a Garrard or other old changer if you don't have the money to spend in order to have it rebuilt. These machines are really requiring a FULL rebuild in order to work properly.....
Sometimes, if you fix only a part of the machine, then usually another problem will appear in another area, thus it is more economical to have it rebuilt, in order to let it serve you for years.

I am only 14 years old and I just bought a junk BSR changer for $5 last January. It had a lot of problems.... it won't start, it won't stop, and practically useless. Using some tools, alcohol, some other stuff and patience, I was able to fully rebuild it for under $10..... on my own, without ANY assistance from anyone. It's now sitting in my hi-fi rack and it replaced my very nice Technics SL-1200 which I sold for only $15.

I recommend that you rebuild that machine.... I'm sure you can do it. Lay out all the parts in order. Try to use lacquer (not paint) thinner for cleaning non-plastic parts, use Naptha (Zippo) liquid lighter fluid for cleaning plastic parts. Sometimes, it IS necessary to slightly bend a part in order to make the whole machine work properly. Examine all parts carefully and check their operation..... I'm sure you'll find the source of the trouble of your Lab 80 if you do it.

Jonathan B.
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Postby nat » 15 Feb 2005 04:08

One possible solution: there is a cam/lever on the central cam -- I don't know what the actual name is for the part, but it is the big geared thing attached to the spindle -- that is supposed to move freely since it is the thing that sets everything in motion when the central cam moves -- that gets immobilised by dry grease. If you clean this, it might help.
But I agree with you -- the Lab 80 simply isn't worth the money needed to get it repaired. Not only is the arm not wood -- thats a wood insert in a pot metal arm -- but the horizontal bearing is very sloppy -- only the high mass of the arm keeps it from vibrating.
If you are passsionate about the turntable, then maybe its worth putting a lot of money into it, but frankly, its hard to see why anyone would be passionate about a Lab 80 -- one man's opinion.
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Self service

Postby Steerpike_jhb » 15 Feb 2005 19:32

No specific knowledge of your problem, but
I must agree with Jonathan B. - well said.
Exclusively mechanical turntables are generally easy to self-service, at least if no parts are broken. Mostly all they need is a disassembly and good clean, for which you need no expert knowledge, although maybe some special tools (still a good investment for future projects).
Exceptions are the trendy 'electronic' drive systems of the 1980s, where electronics knowledge is sometimes needed.

My recomendation for general cleaning of gears, rubber bits, bearings, etc. is mineral turpentine; it's cheap enuff that you don't worry about using buckets of it (which you need to do to get rid of ALL that old oil & goo).

In fact you can (& I do) submerge the entire under-chassis of the turntable in a large trough of turpentine, & leave it to soak, with the occasional poke of a paintbrush. This gets most of the goo out if you don't have the patience to totally strip it down.
Be cautious about two things:
(1) The bearings will all be degreased, so those prone to wear MUST be relubricated.
(2) give the thing a few days to dry out afterwards: a spark or similar from a mains switch could ignite any remaining turpentine.

A soak in turpentine is also great for removing any glued on parts (trim panels) if you need to process or clean them separately.

The only negative point I've had with turpentine is that OCCASIONALLY it removes printed-on legends, but most are not harmed by it.
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LAB-80 repair

Postby LAB80daave » 15 Feb 2005 21:30

Thank you all for your help. I AM IMPRESSED,Johnathan, with your knowledge, especially for a fourteen year old!! I had thought about disassembling the LAB-80, cleaning it and then reassembling it. After fiddling with it for a while-that seems like a humongous task. There are many,many mechanical arms and levers-it is built like a tank!! The various levers and arms are all built out of HEAVY metal!! I am going to try and clean as much of it as I can without disassembling-especially the main cam gear that controls a lot of the functions. It is fairly clean-I am the original owner and I took fairly good care of it-until I packed it away 6 years ago. It has become more of a "crusade" to get the thing to properly work. Any and all suggestions are appreciated.
Thanks-Cheers-Dave
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Don't give up

Postby donfranquito » 18 Feb 2005 04:15

I have owned my lab 80 since 1967. Last year I spent $50 (for the first time) on a general repair and tune up at a local shop, (plus I was given an MK2 parts table to keep, which I will share if it will help you) and it is a sweet old machine. It tracks well at 1.75 grams, cues delicately up and down, never skips, and sounds much better than my 2 CD players, and as good as my friends modern Sony TT (Actually much better, but his speaker placement sucks so I'll give him a handicap..) So, obviously I think it's worth restoring, in spite of fairly consistent bad press I've encountered. With my $50 cartridge, I think I would have to spend $500+ to beat it.
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Postby jbautist2 » 19 Feb 2005 03:00

Days before I rebuilt my BSR, I took a look at the mechanism underneath..... just like you, I saw a lot of levers and arms made of METAL... and I thought I'll be unable to do it.
But, I made myself brave enough....... then I stripped my BSR to the bone, laying all disassembled parts in order, cleaning them, relubing them, and re-assembling them. Even the motor was removed from the chassis and was cleaned & relubed.

Disassembly is EASY, re-assembly is also easy IF you can remember where the parts are originally located.

Yes, bearings and their slots must be cleaned thoroughly, and you must relube them with fine machine oil.

Do NOT use ANY OTHER solvent other than lacquer thinner for cleaning metal parts. USE ONLY liquid lighter fluid for cleaning plastic parts in the mechanism. This is what Joel (of The Turntable Factory) does in the turntables he get.... it works. He's been doing it since 1968.

It takes about 2-4 hours for a beginner to do a self-rebuild. I tell you: YOU CANNOT FIX THAT LAB 80 WITHOUT GETTING THE AUTOMATIC MECHANISM COMPLETELY DISASSEMBLED AND CLEANED. That's the only way that you'll be able to fix the lever problem and OTHER problems that you may NOT notice. This is also the time to slightly bend and/or adjust some parts that do NOT work properly. After it, you'll have a fully-working machine that'll not need servicing for 15+ years.

Remember, I'm only a 14-year-old living in Philippines (South-East Asia)... away from the turntable experts of the U.S.A..... I was able to do the strip-to-the-bone rebuild without any assistance from an adult. Thus, I'm expecting that an OLDER person can rebuild his turntable! You can rebuild your Lab 80! You can do it!

Jonathan B.
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LAB 80 start problem

Postby LAB80daave » 20 Feb 2005 00:21

Thanks to all who offered advice-especially you, Jonathan. I took quite a bit of the mechanism apart and discovered that the "Cueing Cam Assembly" (part #70782)was stuck tight. After carefully prying it off-discovered that the shaft it was on was pretty well gummed up with a white corrossion-type substance. Cleaned it as well as most everying else, lubed it with a product I bought on ebay-called "ONCE" and it seems to run fine. Also discovered that the racetrack containing the 5 small ball bearings was missing 4-so per another suggestion on this site, replaced that racetrack with a nylon washer that was almost exactly the right size and thickness. Probably not quite as good as using a "teflon" washer-but right now it is running very smoothly. Have to wait and see!!. Again THANKS to all who responded and offered very helpful advice.
Cheers-Dave
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Postby jbautist2 » 20 Feb 2005 04:02

See? Rebuilding does REVEAL your turntable's problems. You saw 2 problems already in a small part of the mechanism.... when you take the whole mechanism apart, there may be additional problems that'll show up... all I can say, you're doing great, Dave. Do clean & lube the whole mechanism the best you can.
Take note, however, that there are parts in the mechanism that should have NO lubricant. Therefore, be careful not to spread any lube to those areas, as it will render your machine inoperative.
Keep us updated about your Lab 80's "rebuild".... Jonathan B.
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Postby Beobloke » 23 Mar 2005 14:17

I am only 14 years old and I just bought a junk BSR changer for $5 last January. It's now sitting in my hi-fi rack and it replaced my very nice Technics SL-1200 which I sold for only $15.


That has to be the most astounding DOWNgrade i've ever heard of!! :lol:

Adam.
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Garrard Lab 80 Parts

Postby jim_Clary » 08 Jan 2010 15:08

Does anyone know where I can find a replacement rubber wheel for my Lab 80?

Alternatively, is it possible to adjust the position of my old wheel so it does not slip?

thanks!

Jim
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Re: Garrard Lab 80 Parts

Postby Alec124c41 » 08 Jan 2010 20:01

jim_Clary wrote:Does anyone know where I can find a replacement rubber wheel for my Lab 80?

Alternatively, is it possible to adjust the position of my old wheel so it does not slip?

thanks!

Jim


If you have cleaned both drive spindle and platter areas of contact, as well as the idler wheel, and sanded the edge of the turning wheel lightly, and oiled all bearings to reduce friction, you may want to try Ed Crockett
http://www.vintagelectronics.com/Rebuild.htm

Cheers,
Alec
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Re: Garrard Lab 80 Parts

Postby aardvarkash10 » 09 Jan 2010 01:37

jim_Clary wrote:Does anyone know where I can find a replacement rubber wheel for my Lab 80?

Alternatively, is it possible to adjust the position of my old wheel so it does not slip?

thanks!

Jim


Here - http://www.thevoiceofmusic.com/catalog/ ... ategories=
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