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Stubborn clicks/pops/Disc Doctor/Windex/GruveGlide

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Stubborn clicks/pops/Disc Doctor/Windex/GruveGlide

Postby Ken Arroyo » 13 Dec 2008 05:39

I've been buying a lot of old classical vinyl lately. It just strikes me how much more involving it sounds compared to CD. Anyway, this has led me on a quest for a good (and inexpensive) record cleaner.
I tried the wood glue method mentioned elsewhere on the forum, but it didn't really live up to its promise. Besides, it is very time-consuming.
Next came a set of brushes and cleaning fluid from Disc Doctor. These weren't exactly cheap, but they've worked better so far than anything else.
Anything else, that is, until I sprayed my old Watts Disc Preener with Windex, applied it to a record, and played immediately on my Dual 1219/Ortofon OM 10 combo. All surface noise and ticks/pops VANISHED.
However, as the Windex dried, I became aware of of noises which suggest that the Windex might be leaving some kind of residue as it dried.
The fact that noises disappeared as the stylus tracked a "wet" record suggests that some product with lubricating qualities might be in order. Does anyone have any experience with Gruve Glide?
Thanks!
Ken
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Postby Alec124c41 » 13 Dec 2008 06:08

Do not play a wet record.
Thirty years ago, Lenco had an arm something like a Dust Bug that made the surface of the record wet as it played. The problem was that it essentially destroyed the records.
There are other options. I have used Sound Guard. I presume Gruv Glide is a similar preparation. Try it. You might like it.
BTW, the ammonia in Windex can be harmful to vinyl.

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Postby classicstylus » 13 Dec 2008 11:07

Ken, I buy lots of used LPs, all of which are carefully cleaned before playing. I prefer the Knosti Disc-antistat to start with. Dust and solid contaminants fall away in solution as you twiddle the LP in the plastic bath. When the LP has drip-dried in the supplied rack, I give it a second clean with a Loricraft RCM, if necessary. The RCM is expensive, but the Knosti isn't. I don't think any collector should be without one. All good wishes, Michael.
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Postby lanny » 13 Dec 2008 16:28

Ken, your Disc Doctor kit will become even more effective as you gain experience in using it. I assume you have the DD Miracle Record Cleaner fluid and are diluting it according to the instructions. The brush is not for scrubbing, only applying and agitating the liquid, so don't use much more pressure than the weight of the brush. If pops still remain, try leaving the fluid on the record longer--up to a minute--before wiping it off and rinsing. For really stubborn cases, try using undiluted cleaner, followed by two rinse steps. I've salvaged LPs that friends gave me as hopelessly unplayable.
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Postby XTRProf » 16 Dec 2008 04:24

Alec124c41 wrote:Do not play a wet record.
Thirty years ago, Lenco had an arm something like a Dust Bug that made the surface of the record wet as it played. The problem was that it essentially destroyed the records.
There are other options. I have used Sound Guard. I presume Gruv Glide is a similar preparation. Try it. You might like it.
BTW, the ammonia in Windex can be harmful to vinyl.

Alec



Add to those LAST record preservative. Yes, the Sound Guard is similar to LAST and I had used them many years ago. Are they still around? However, all these are record preservatives and act to lubricate the grooves and are not aids in any sort of "wet" playing.
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Postby Ken Arroyo » 17 Dec 2008 03:08

Gruv-Glide, Knosti Cleaners, RCmachines... Where does it all end? It seems record cleaning is a highly personalized technique. If I were to try every method and formula recommended I would end up spending quite a bit of money (I'm a teacher; I don't make lots of money) and spending a lot of time cleaning (I don't have a lot of time either; teaching is very time consuming).
What I need is a method that will bring the most "bang for the buck"; an effective, simple, safe, efficient,and economical way of cleaning records.
I know there is no such thing as a "magic bullet" (there isn't one in teaching either) but there must be some good suggestions out there. Any takers?
Thanks!
Ken
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Postby Alec124c41 » 17 Dec 2008 05:00

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Postby davidsss » 17 Dec 2008 13:00

I always seem to be posting this link, but here it is again:

I use the modified crevice tool described here: http://www.teresaudio.com/haven/cleaner/cleaner.html and clean the records on top of a TT I bought for very little at a Sunday market (removed the tonearm and put a switch in to turn on and off). It works very well for me. I start with a steam clean and wipe it down with a Selleys Super Cloth. Follow this with a clean with cleaning fluid made from 30% isopropyl, 70% distilled water and a few drops of dishwasher rinse aid, this is vacuumed off. Lastly I clean with straight distilled water, this is a rinse cycle, and vacuum off the water. I have 2 modified crevice tools for the last 2 stages and I apply cleaning fluid and distilled water using Disc Doctor brushes. This is a cheap and very effective method for me. If I really can't get a stain off I wash the record in warm water with one third vinegar, it gets a lot of grime off.

I'm not loaded either but I reckon my method works just as well as an RCM, it just takes more labour.

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Postby jmailand » 17 Dec 2008 14:37

I have used Gruv Glide, I thinks it works well as a record lubricant. It will work as cleaner but it takes a while, I have noticed that if you let a coated record sit for a month or so and then play it the little crap deep in the grooves will rise to the top. I think the lubricant soaks into the dust and eventually loosens its hold so the needle can push it to the top. Records I coated with the stuff before a had a good cleaning method have been played clean and now sound quiet. One thing though, you cant judge Gruv Glides sound on the first couple plays from my experience. I think you have to play it couple of time to get the needle to a spread the stuff evenly, after that though the sound gets better or at least the Gruv Glide is not effecting or has a neutral effect the sound.
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Postby Willem1671 » 30 Dec 2008 01:17

All second hand records I buy are cleaned first. I do this by placing the Knosty clamp over the label area and rinse the record with luke warm water from the tap and some dishwashing fluid to remove all dust and finger prints. Rinse thoroughly. I then dry them using a lint free cloth and IMMEDIATELY clean the record with the Disco Antistat record cleaner solution. The pre-cleaning with tap water is to keep the original Disco Antistat solution as clean as possible so it can be used several times. However, I'd suggest to throw the solution away after having it used for appr. 5 times. And always filter the used solution when pooring it back into the bottle. Not by using those thin inlays, most fluid will pass unfiltered. I use coffee filterpaper instead. Takes a bit longer but the fluid stays much cleaner.

Cleaned records may leave some debris on the stylus tip during first playback of a freshly cleaned record. And this debris may cause some serious needle skip at low tracking forces, a serious setback if asked me.
The only solution is playing the record and clean the needle tip several times during first playback. Most debris are gone after first playback however. Remove the last traces of wet fluid manually to prevent large amounts of debris at the drying spots, usually present at the inner grooves at the top position and the outer grooves at the bottom position of the record.
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Postby ripblade » 04 Jan 2009 18:57

davidsss wrote:I always seem to be posting this link, but here it is again:

I use the modified crevice tool described here: http://www.teresaudio.com/haven/cleaner/cleaner.html .....


This rig is similar to mine, but better laid out. I don't like the crevice tool, however. I tried it with mine and found the vacuum suction is quite poor. Much better is the upholstery attachment which draws vacuum from the centre of the wand with a more streamlined airflow. By closing the factory opening and cutting a narrow slot at the leading edge, the upholstery attachment develops incredible suction that can easily pick any record up off the mat.
How boring it would be, this endeavor
If all we heard was "perfect sound forever"
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Use Gruv-Glide after a vacuum cleaning...

Postby curtis3328 » 20 Jan 2009 22:46

I've been using G-G for 22 years. It won't make a scratchy record sound less scratchy, but it is a 2nd line cleaner. After a thorough scrubbing in my VPI 16.5 I let the record dry and treat it with G-G II.

It it as Brian75 described it; it eliminates static from the surface, cleans off fingerprints and other schmootz, protects the surface from further damage. View your efforts under a And, it allows the stylus to track smoothly resulting in a tighter image and bigger soundstage.

I then place the record in a new inner sleeve, tossing out the old one unless it contains information germain to the album. I also put the record in a new plastic outer sleeve to protect the jacket and to let me know that it's clean and ready to play.

I will NEVER play a record until it's been cleaned and treated as above! Have fun!
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Postby curtis3328 » 20 Jan 2009 22:54

One more thing; build a cleaning station with a 40 watt light bulb over the flat. toweled surface you use for applying G-G so you can best see the surface blemishes. Scratches and groove damage will show up much better than under indirect lighting or florescent bulbs. They're too diffuse.
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Postby manjo » 30 Jan 2009 08:10

I buy a lot of used LPs, most of them really dirty records. I use phoenix cleaner with enzyme and then a treatment of gruv-glide fixes most of them. I have over 500 classic LPs some recorded in the 30's fixed in this manner. I am happy with the results.
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Cleaning Technique Development

Postby OCreel » 25 Nov 2009 05:47

Reading all of these posts is incredible. I too have records (1000's) both old and brand new 200gm top quality pressings that have sooo many clicks/pops that I am ready to sell the whole damn lot of them or breakout my Remington 1100 12 guage. For example I have a brand spankin new Van Morrison Moondance reissue. I waited 21 months for this f___ing thing from Acoustic Sounds. My goddamn popcorn maker makes less noise. I'm playing it on very nice equipment (Benz Ruby 2). Hey, if I turn it up loud enough they go away. Out of the jacket I cleaned it with "The Disc Doctor's Quick Wash Record Cleaner" they recommend with my VPI machine. This liquid is "Specially Formulated For Use With Vacuum Based Cleaning Machines". It does not contain isopropyl alcohol.

Question 1: It doesn't flow well due to surface tension. I have taken to mixing the smallest amount possible of PhotoFlow until it flows. I mean I add drops only. I read about using "Jet Dry" to reduce surface tension. Please feel free to weigh in on both liquids. (If I could figure out how the change the damn text color I would)

I am going to bring an ultrasonic unit into the equation. Fill it with 80% distilled water/20% isopropyl alcohol and arrange a spindle above the water bath and rotate the disc very slowly through the solution. After that I will clean it again on the VPI 17 and try it out. If anyone can think of anything to add please let me know. I would think this should clean it up as much as possible. I am then going to play it dry and then wet for comparison. Please feel free to go to town on this.
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