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Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 16 Nov 2019 21:57
by truedeth
Bill_Ashton wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:46
Is this from the days of the "power wars?"...about the time that disco hit? Late 70's, most of the 80's, I never followed music, just played what I had on my Sansui 3000 (then Sony STRV35) into my Bose 901's. Seems that I missed out on a whole 'nother generation of gear!

That Pioneer is absolutely beautiful: why can't they bring back the "silver face" once again?
Agreed. It's why I stayed with my Technics 70s era receiver with it's round knobs instead of replacing it with a JVC 1982 receiver with square buttons and slides.
IMG_20190206_221826.jpg
My gorgeous Technics sa-5370
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My parent's JVC R-X60 receiver
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 16 Nov 2019 22:32
by lenjack
Most powerful was the Technics SA-1000, at 330 watts per channel, at 0.03% THD, a spec which it honestly met. There's one on ebay for $3000, claimed to be in good condition, except switched need cleaning. Local pickup only.

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 16 Nov 2019 23:48
by ravelax
lenjack wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:03
Those were the days when Pioneer, Technics, Kenwood, Sansui, Sherwood, Scott, Fisher, and others, were all trying to put as many buttons, knobs, and switches as possible, on the front panels to outdo each other, in order to impress people.
And it sure is impressive! :) On modern receivers every function is hidden away in digital menus hardly accessible by any other means than a cumbersome remote control. I like not only the look and feel of lots of knobs, switches and buttons, but also the accessibility. There's also an aspect of "honesty" in such design that I appreciate, showing exactly what the piece of equipment can and cannot do - these days it's always hard to be sure from just taking a quick look at the piece, you'd have to read the manual.

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 17 Nov 2019 09:20
by Tinkaroo
truedeth wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:57
Bill_Ashton wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:46
Is this from the days of the "power wars?"...about the time that disco hit? Late 70's, most of the 80's, I never followed music, just played what I had on my Sansui 3000 (then Sony STRV35) into my Bose 901's. Seems that I missed out on a whole 'nother generation of gear!

That Pioneer is absolutely beautiful: why can't they bring back the "silver face" once again?
Agreed. It's why I stayed with my Technics 70s era receiver with it's round knobs instead of replacing it with a JVC 1982 receiver with square buttons and slides.

IMG_20190206_221826.jpgIMG_20191116_155620.jpg
I'm sure everyone here would agree you made a very wise choice! 8)

It's unfortunate that due to rising production costs many manufacturers cheapened the quality of their consumer equipment after the 1970s. Eventually we ended up with what we like to call BPC for "black plastic crap" and the all in one CD/cassette players that some liked to call stereos, which are now only good for paperweights or door stops.

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 17 Nov 2019 09:38
by Tinkaroo
ravelax wrote:
16 Nov 2019 23:48
lenjack wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:03
Those were the days when Pioneer, Technics, Kenwood, Sansui, Sherwood, Scott, Fisher, and others, were all trying to put as many buttons, knobs, and switches as possible, on the front panels to outdo each other, in order to impress people.
And it sure is impressive! :) On modern receivers every function is hidden away in digital menus hardly accessible by any other means than a cumbersome remote control. I like not only the look and feel of lots of knobs, switches and buttons, but also the accessibility. There's also an aspect of "honesty" in such design that I appreciate, showing exactly what the piece of equipment can and cannot do - these days it's always hard to be sure from just taking a quick look at the piece, you'd have to read the manual.
I agree. All these buttons and switches served a purpose and added to the versatility of the receiver. They allowed you to adjust tone, switch speaker inputs, monitor tape or source, apply high and low filters, function selectors or whatever.
Some could do it in a more aesthetically pleasing styling than others however. Of course there were also copycats.

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 17 Nov 2019 10:05
by Tinkaroo
Speaking of speakers,knobs and switches this is my Yamaha CR-1000 receiver. They changed their styling slightly in the next generation and even added square-oblong knobs. This model was their top of the line and more rare than the next generation CR-1020. The CR-1000 was an FM only model.
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Yamaha CR-1000 Front 4.jpg
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 17 Nov 2019 19:41
by lenjack
Tinkaroo wrote:
17 Nov 2019 09:38
ravelax wrote:
16 Nov 2019 23:48
lenjack wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:03
Those were the days when Pioneer, Technics, Kenwood, Sansui, Sherwood, Scott, Fisher, and others, were all trying to put as many buttons, knobs, and switches as possible, on the front panels to outdo each other, in order to impress people.
And it sure is impressive! :) On modern receivers every function is hidden away in digital menus hardly accessible by any other means than a cumbersome remote control. I like not only the look and feel of lots of knobs, switches and buttons, but also the accessibility. There's also an aspect of "honesty" in such design that I appreciate, showing exactly what the piece of equipment can and cannot do - these days it's always hard to be sure from just taking a quick look at the piece, you'd have to read the manual.
I agree. All these buttons and switches served a purpose and added to the versatility of the receiver. They allowed you to adjust tone, switch speaker inputs, monitor tape or source, apply high and low filters, function selectors or whatever.
Some could do it in a more aesthetically pleasing styling than others however. Of course there were also copycats.
Well yes, but many of the control were superfluous, and weren't really needed, and in many cases, were never even used. It was supposed to impress your friends and neighbors. It was a case of acute "controlitis"

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 18 Nov 2019 16:07
by Adamo0926
lenjack wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:03
Those were the days when Pioneer, Technics, Kenwood, Sansui, Sherwood, Scott, Fisher, and others, were all trying to put as many buttons, knobs, and switches as possible, on the front panels to outdo each other, in order to impress people.
You forgot Yamaha !
CR2020b.jpeg
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 18 Nov 2019 16:46
by Brewman2
After a light dusting in a B.J. (lol) also sprayed the pot's
my SX - 980 is ready for her layout.

Keep the vintage Por-nogrphy coming!

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 19 Nov 2019 03:20
by truedeth
Adamo0926 wrote:
18 Nov 2019 16:07
lenjack wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:03
Those were the days when Pioneer, Technics, Kenwood, Sansui, Sherwood, Scott, Fisher, and others, were all trying to put as many buttons, knobs, and switches as possible, on the front panels to outdo each other, in order to impress people.
You forgot Yamaha !
CR2020b.jpeg
Oh those flat knobs look enticing to turn. Do they make clunks like old uhf/vhf TVs or soft clicks?

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 19 Nov 2019 12:48
by Tinkaroo
Brewman2 wrote:
18 Nov 2019 16:46
After a light dusting in a B.J. (lol) also sprayed the pot's
my SX - 980 is ready for her layout.

Keep the vintage Por-nogrphy coming!
That's a beautiful Pioneer! 8)

I'm sure it sounds great and makes you happy which is what it's all about. =D>

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 19 Nov 2019 14:50
by vinyl master
They're all beautiful works of art, ain't they??? :D

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 20 Nov 2019 22:13
by ravelax
lenjack wrote:
17 Nov 2019 19:41
Tinkaroo wrote:
17 Nov 2019 09:38
ravelax wrote:
16 Nov 2019 23:48

And it sure is impressive! :) On modern receivers every function is hidden away in digital menus hardly accessible by any other means than a cumbersome remote control. I like not only the look and feel of lots of knobs, switches and buttons, but also the accessibility. There's also an aspect of "honesty" in such design that I appreciate, showing exactly what the piece of equipment can and cannot do - these days it's always hard to be sure from just taking a quick look at the piece, you'd have to read the manual.
I agree. All these buttons and switches served a purpose and added to the versatility of the receiver. They allowed you to adjust tone, switch speaker inputs, monitor tape or source, apply high and low filters, function selectors or whatever.
Some could do it in a more aesthetically pleasing styling than others however. Of course there were also copycats.
Well yes, but many of the control were superfluous, and weren't really needed, and in many cases, were never even used. It was supposed to impress your friends and neighbors. It was a case of acute "controlitis"
Well yeah, sometimes. One thing I've never understood is the "reverse stereo" option found on some amps and receivers. But most of the typical features such as filters etc, I find can be very useful on occasion.

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 20 Nov 2019 22:21
by lenjack
You had "partial blend" on some, which would reduce the amount of separation on some cuts, if you thought there was too much. As you rotated the control, the sound would go from "wide" to "narrow" to "mono". Unneeded, I think.

Also, "Reverse", which, as the name implies, would reverse the left and right channels. Never had that on any of my stuff, but if I did, it would have never been used.

Re: Vintage Receivers

Posted: 21 Nov 2019 12:48
by Tinkaroo
This thread helps explain why they included a reverse stereo mode switch on a lot of amps and receivers even if it might not seem to be a useful control. For some situations and users it does serve a purpose.

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