Vintage Receivers

amplifiers, receivers and loudspeakers
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ravelax
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by ravelax » 21 Nov 2019 18:05

Tinkaroo wrote:
21 Nov 2019 12:48
This thread helps explain why they included a reverse stereo mode switch on a lot of amps and receivers even if it might not seem to be a useful control. For some situations and users it does serve a purpose.

viewtopic.php?t=84238
Interesting thread! Can't believe I hadn't thought of all those reasons mentioned before, although for the most part they seem of minor importance to me. Anyway, the thread actually got me interested in finding such an amp or receiver to experiment with the reverse mode! The "blend" function lenjack mentions also sounds interesting. I've never seen it on an amp or receiver myself, though I think I would have had more use for that function than the reverse mode, it would be interesting to experiment with on some reprocessed-for-stereo mono recordings, for example. Still, I'd agree it's an unecessary function.

Adamo0926
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by Adamo0926 » 24 Nov 2019 02:05

truedeth wrote:
19 Nov 2019 03:20
Adamo0926 wrote:
18 Nov 2019 16:07
lenjack wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:03
Those were the days when Pioneer, Technics, Kenwood, Sansui, Sherwood, Scott, Fisher, and others, were all trying to put as many buttons, knobs, and switches as possible, on the front panels to outdo each other, in order to impress people.
You forgot Yamaha !
CR2020b.jpeg
Oh those flat knobs look enticing to turn. Do they make clunks like old uhf/vhf TVs or soft clicks?
Soft clicks if anything

Alec124c41
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by Alec124c41 » 24 Nov 2019 21:15

I have late '70s Yamaha equipment. They used round knobs for adjustments (volume, loudness, tones, tuning), and the flat knobs for selector switches. Very nice to use.

Cheers,
Alec

lenjack
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by lenjack » 24 Nov 2019 21:32

That vintage stuff was gorgeous...so much better looking than today's plastic.

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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by guyo12345 » 27 Nov 2019 23:52

jdjohn wrote:
09 Jul 2018 17:11
Tinkaroo wrote:That looks like it will be a beautiful receiver when you're done fixing it! 8)

I would love to see a photo of it once it's all back together again.

From what I've been able to gather they were a house brand for Playback Audio out of Chicago, and people aren't in agreement as to which manufacturer may have built it for them. Some guess Foster who built also equipment for others such as Radio Shack. It's also complicated by similarities in styling to other marquee brands on the markets which was probably intentional.
There's not a lot of information about them (e.g., no service manuals I could find). Some say they are identical to a similar Telefunken model. A local friend of mine who works on vintage gear had one of these units pass through his hands at one point, and he thinks he has a manual for it, but can't seem to find it now :( As he and I looked it over, he commented that it looked similar to a Pioneer design, and in fact, he had a Pioneer parts unit that we were able to grab a couple of parts from.

This will be slow-going for me since I don't have a schematic or parts list to work from. I'm literally having to examine the parts individually as I go and write them down, take pictures as to location/orientation on the boards, place my orders, etc. But the caps are done, so now on to the transistors.
Any updates on the restoration ? I have the Telefunken version you mentioned in good working order but I love to learn : )

jdjohn
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by jdjohn » 28 Nov 2019 01:05

guyo12345 wrote:
27 Nov 2019 23:52
jdjohn wrote:
09 Jul 2018 17:11
Tinkaroo wrote:That looks like it will be a beautiful receiver when you're done fixing it! 8)

I would love to see a photo of it once it's all back together again.

From what I've been able to gather they were a house brand for Playback Audio out of Chicago, and people aren't in agreement as to which manufacturer may have built it for them. Some guess Foster who built also equipment for others such as Radio Shack. It's also complicated by similarities in styling to other marquee brands on the markets which was probably intentional.
There's not a lot of information about them (e.g., no service manuals I could find). Some say they are identical to a similar Telefunken model. A local friend of mine who works on vintage gear had one of these units pass through his hands at one point, and he thinks he has a manual for it, but can't seem to find it now :( As he and I looked it over, he commented that it looked similar to a Pioneer design, and in fact, he had a Pioneer parts unit that we were able to grab a couple of parts from.

This will be slow-going for me since I don't have a schematic or parts list to work from. I'm literally having to examine the parts individually as I go and write them down, take pictures as to location/orientation on the boards, place my orders, etc. But the caps are done, so now on to the transistors.
Any updates on the restoration ? I have the Telefunken version you mentioned in good working order but I love to learn : )
Hi Guyo,

Sadly, no updates on it. I've had parts issues and...well...I almost fried one of the power supply boards #-o If you happen to have a service manual, I would be most grateful :D

snavarre
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by snavarre » 05 Dec 2019 18:41

lenjack wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:03
Those were the days when Pioneer, Technics, Kenwood, Sansui, Sherwood, Scott, Fisher, and others, were all trying to put as many buttons, knobs, and switches as possible, on the front panels to outdo each other, in order to impress people.
Case in point! Look at this beauty. I just snagged this early 1980's MCS Modular Component Systems receiver at a thrift store. If one recalls MCS was the JC Penny house brand back then, but were apparently made by Technics-Panasonic or NEC. This is model 3245 which according to one site was one of the best of the brand for the time. (JC Penny's was serious about competing with the top brands back then) This site even said spec-wise it rivaled the Marantz units at the time. It even has a wood case.

I just hooked it up in my office and have to say it sounds awesome! I now have to figure out a way to re-rig my main audio turntable setup at home to fit this beast. lol I also scored the matching tape deck, which as far as I can tell was from 1978 and made in Japan. Like the receiver has all metal knobs and switches. It also features a matrix speaker output system which I gather is a precursor to surround.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... -01-X4.jpg
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... -01-X4.jpg
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... -01-X4.jpg
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... 886-X3.jpg
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... 061-X4.jpg

Tape deck:
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... HDR-X4.jpg

Bill_Ashton
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by Bill_Ashton » 05 Dec 2019 19:17

There is something very Sansui-ish about that MCS receiver. I am thinking the ball-and-socket AM antenna may be a clue?

snavarre
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by snavarre » 05 Dec 2019 19:21

Bill_Ashton wrote:
05 Dec 2019 19:17
There is something very Sansui-ish about that MCS receiver. I am thinking the ball-and-socket AM antenna may be a clue?
Interesting. You'd be the first, I've read anyway, to mention Sansui and MCS. That said, it seems a mystery who actually made these.

Bill_Ashton
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by Bill_Ashton » 05 Dec 2019 19:33

I could be way off base, but somewhere I have seen someone selling repro Sansui AM radio mounts like your MCS has, and haven't seen one before your image...of course, maybe I have led a sheltered life.

Also, look at the knob layout, very Sansui G-series like, though not sure the switches are...look back in this thread.

snavarre
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by snavarre » 05 Dec 2019 19:52

Bill_Ashton wrote:
05 Dec 2019 19:33
I could be way off base, but somewhere I have seen someone selling repro Sansui AM radio mounts like your MCS has, and haven't seen one before your image...of course, maybe I have led a sheltered life.

Also, look at the knob layout, very Sansui G-series like, though not sure the switches are...look back in this thread.
Googled "Sansui G series". Holy shite! They are very similar indeed! That had to be an influence by the JCPenny people in the designing of that. Good call.

Bill_Ashton
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by Bill_Ashton » 05 Dec 2019 20:12

Go back to Page 90, 'bout halfway down...I posted an image of the mighty G22000...sadly, resolution is not good enough to see switch labeling, but look that one up...

snavarre
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by snavarre » 05 Dec 2019 20:24

Wow. That had to be an influence on this beast. Here's a shot showing the top too.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... 653-X4.jpg

Tinkaroo
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by Tinkaroo » 05 Dec 2019 20:32

snavarre wrote:
05 Dec 2019 18:41
lenjack wrote:
16 Nov 2019 21:03
Those were the days when Pioneer, Technics, Kenwood, Sansui, Sherwood, Scott, Fisher, and others, were all trying to put as many buttons, knobs, and switches as possible, on the front panels to outdo each other, in order to impress people.
Case in point! Look at this beauty. I just snagged this early 1980's MCS Modular Component Systems receiver at a thrift store. If one recalls MCS was the JC Penny house brand back then, but were apparently made by Technics-Panasonic or NEC. This is model 3245 which according to one site was one of the best of the brand for the time. (JC Penny's was serious about competing with the top brands back then) This site even said spec-wise it rivaled the Marantz units at the time. It even has a wood case.

I just hooked it up in my office and have to say it sounds awesome! I now have to figure out a way to re-rig my main audio turntable setup at home to fit this beast. lol I also scored the matching tape deck, which as far as I can tell was from 1978 and made in Japan. Like the receiver has all metal knobs and switches. It also features a matrix speaker output system which I gather is a precursor to surround.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... -01-X4.jpg
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... -01-X4.jpg
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... -01-X4.jpg
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... 886-X3.jpg
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... 061-X4.jpg

Tape deck:
https://photos.smugmug.com/Vintage-Audi ... HDR-X4.jpg
That looks like a very nice receiver. 8)

I gather it's rated at 45 watts per channel and believed to be have been built by Capetronics Corp. in Taiwan.

The styling is a bit reminiscent of the Sansui G series and perhaps Technics.

snavarre
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Re: Vintage Receivers

Post by snavarre » 05 Dec 2019 20:42

Tinkaroo wrote:
05 Dec 2019 20:32

That looks like a very nice receiver. 8)

I gather it's rated at 45 watts per channel and believed to be have been built by Capetronics Corp. in Taiwan.

The styling is a bit reminiscent of the Sansui G series and perhaps Technics.
I have researched online for two days now I have not seen any reference to MCS and Capetronics. Never even heard of Capetronics. Not saying I know anything about this stuff. It's just that there seems to be little concrete info about MCS manufacturing. Can you elaborate if possible? :)

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