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Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 18 Apr 2016 18:13
by ToolBee
It's not just ripping I do! There's a lot of edits in removing clicks and cracks, EQ-ing, leveling and such, which work best in WAV (24bit/96kHz).

I record everything into Soundforge and go from there.

Of course I prefer to edit as little as possible...

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 19 Apr 2016 05:37
by Jwest 1197
Diamond Audio makes a great interface for $25. It doesn't come with RIAA EQ curves, but it works fine with the tape monitor of a good vintage amp, and as a result works well for any analog format. Just be sure to have the RCA to Mini Jack adapter.
http://www.frys.com/product/8457418?sit ... IN_RSLT_PG

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 19 Apr 2016 10:06
by ToolBee
This one ticks quite a few boxes, for me, working RCA-level.

http://static.bax-shop.nl/image/product ... 2x4_11.jpg

http://www.bax-shop.nl/externe-audio-in ... en-usb-hub

Gotta keep it "home"! ;)

This one lO_Oks good as well, but needs RCA to XLR conversion...

http://static.bax-shop.nl/image/product ... _angle.jpg

http://www.bax-shop.nl/externe-audio-in ... -interface

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 24 Apr 2016 06:03
by Ugly
Rip with one of these soundcards

https://www.asus.com/us/Essence-Hi-Fi-A ... ssence_ST/

use 2 of these mic preamps line inputs to set levels with.

http://www.true-systems.com/p-solo.html

Works great for me.

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 24 Apr 2016 14:22
by ToolBee
@ugly:

Why do you use a mic-pre-amp? There's no RIAA correction in those to hook up a record player!?

I have hooked up my PC as were it a casettedeck, on the tape in/out of my (pre)amplifier. Which has a (very!) proper phono-stage.

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 24 Apr 2016 15:43
by Ugly
Heh. Ooops, should have been more clear.

I feed the mic preamps with the output of a standard phono stage. The mic preamps are only in there so I can set the level feeding the ADC (soundcard).

When I first tried recording with my phono stage feeding the ADC directly, no mic preamps in the chain, I had noticed that much of my collection was coming in with peaks 20-30dB lower than the 0dB mark. I became worried worried I'd leave too much dynamic range wasted. The soundcard has no way to boost gain for really quiet recordings or attenuate for overly loud ones. Boosting the gain in the analog domain allows it to happen without the distortion due to computational error that would occur by adding gain digitally. I began looking for some quiet , low distortion, mic preamps for the job.

With the mic preamps in there I dial in the levels before I start ripping just like I used to do when I'd record vinyl to cassette back in the day. The mic preamps seem real clean and nice and don't color the result much if any that I hear. Definitely put my mind at ease.

Edit: one more thing maybe I should make clear. The P-Solo calls itself a microphone preamp. In reality I'm using it for its built in instrument preamp circuit and the mic preamp is left unused. So, technically I'm using instrument premps not microphone preamps. Figured I'd point this out for anyone going the similar route. In my opinion the higher impedance instrument input is more ideal than the lower impedance microphone input would be, typically.

2ndedit: hadn't thought much about it before but could give itg a try with just a head amp in there, ie no analog RIAA correction applied. The p-solos give up to 44dB gain. Maybe I'll play with digital RIAA some and see what happens. The P-Solos are super quiet. Cool!

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 24 Apr 2016 18:33
by Hermetech Mastering
Ugly wrote:When I first tried recording with my phono stage feeding the ADC directly, no mic preamps in the chain, I had noticed that much of my collection was coming in with peaks 20-30dB lower than the 0dB mark. I became worried worried I'd leave too much dynamic range wasted.
Absolutely not a problem if recording in 24 bit. Digital vs. analogue gain is an interesting point, there are pros and cons to both!

How are you achieving the RIAA curve then, on recording, or playback?

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 24 Apr 2016 19:01
by Ugly
In this case the goal was to put the analog problems so far below the digital ones by design there is no argument to be made. Adding the gain digitally would do more damage than adding it in analog if the manfacturer spes of the gear are to be trusted. I think you'll agree that at least on paper the mic preamps I've chosen spec out quite well. I have seen no reason to question the manufacturers quoted specs in having used them though I have no way to verify the numbers. For my purposes this electronics chain has been superb.

As I mentioned earlier. I use a regular phono preamp. It handles the RIAA correction. In one of my edits above I mention looking at digital RIAA too. That also seems interesting, but I haven't tried it before.

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 24 Apr 2016 23:57
by ToolBee
RIAA correction is mainly an EQ setting, if you will, to compensate for non-linearity in human ears. FALSE! read comment above ^ (thx to Manfred!)

EQ-ing can be done digitally too. I see no problem in using (inversed) digital RIAA filters.

It's been done by others: http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/analog-l ... -riaa.html

The only technical advantage over old-fashioned analog filtering is the absence of capacitors, that may add distortion.

But digital EQ-ing introduces a whole new spectrum of possible faults or chances to fail a good result. Depending quite heavily on the quality of the equipment used.

Not to mention the skills of the technician! ;)

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 25 Apr 2016 01:42
by lini
ToolBee wrote:RIAA correction is mainly an EQ setting, if you will, to compensate for non-linearity in human ears. (...)
Sorry, but no - that would be loudness. RIAA re-equalisation is there to compensate the RIAA pre-equalisation, which is applied to improve trackability and to save space by limiting groove width.

Greetings from Munich!

Manfred / lini

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 25 Apr 2016 02:04
by ToolBee
Of course you're right!

How could I? :/

Maybe it's pink and white noise difference that still boggles my ears...

Also "a" RIAA (and DIN and AES/EBU...) correction, just not THIS RIAA correction, for phono.

Sometimes there's too much in my head at once! :)

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 14 May 2016 18:15
by Lowlander2
Hi all,

I wonder why no one has mentioned the Audient ID14 USB interface here before. The forum search doesn't yield any results in any other sections either.

Audient is based in Hampshire, England and known for building top notch professional recording and production gear.

At the 2015 Musikmesse Frankfurt they launched their affordable (well...), compact and extremely well built ID14. I've read a lot about this device before actually buying one. It is a charm to set up and use. I hooked up my phono preamp, speakers, headphone and PC, installed the software and was ready to go. It just works, and the sound is amazingly clean.

Have a nice one,
Low

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 14 May 2016 19:07
by ToolBee
@Lowlander2

Thanks for the link!

That is an option as well. There are so many like it, but very very few that have RCA in- and outputs! :(

As mentioned before, I use my PC as a "tape deck" With my recordplayer hooked up to the same pre-amp with its built-in, pristine, phono amp! Gotta love Rotel just for that! ;)

I work "home" level, or rather "consumer" level (-4db). My PCI card can however be used at +10 db studio level, unbalanced.

btw, I was led to believe THE Technics SL1200 was a better built Akai (AP-207/307)...

Still want one, in black to match the Rotels. Not cheap! :(

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 14 May 2016 20:10
by Lowlander2
ToolBee wrote:There are so many like it, but very very few that have RCA in- and outputs!
The Furutech GT40a USB audio interface, also not mentioned yet in this thread, has RCA inputs for MM, MC and line as well as RCA line outputs. And it's a headphone amp as well. And it looks pretty.

Re: Audio interface manufacturers / products

Posted: 14 May 2016 20:52
by ToolBee
The ADL GT40a USB DAC looks nice indeed! :) Even an MC input! Wow!

This little box will do the trick for me, I guess.

Will look nice underneath an Intel NUC or so!

Best tip so far! Thanks.

instant update:
When I was looking for price here in The Netherlands I found out the importer is a village next to my town! How cool is that?! Maybe save shipping on those 663 euros it costs! Or get a "demo"! ;)